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A Practical Guide to Venture Philanthropy

Bill and Melinda Gates do it. Bill Clinton does it. Bono does it. And thanks to the Internet, the Average Joe can do it. What is it, you ask? It's the new rage in philanthropy. And although it's called by many names including engaged philanthropy, strategic philanthropy, philanthro-capitalism, social entrepreneurship and catalytic philanthropy, among others we'll refer to it as venture philanthropy.

Bill and Melinda Gates do it. Bill Clinton does it. Bono does it. And thanks to the Internet, the Average Joe can do it. What is it, you ask? It's the new rage in philanthropy. And although it's called by many names — including engaged philanthropy, strategic philanthropy, philanthro-capitalism, social entrepreneurship and catalytic philanthropy, among others — we'll refer to it as “venture philanthropy.” Coined by John D. Rockefeller III in the 1960s and popularized by articles in the

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