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Dad Wins No Contest

Some states, such as Florida, ban no-contest clauses in wills as against public policy. A greater number of states allow these measures also known as in terrorem clauses but rarely enforce them. It seems that the law and its practitioners are reluctant to deny people, even disgruntled heirs, their day in court. And there's that maxim: The law abhors a forfeiture. Unfortunately for a brother and sister,

Some states, such as Florida, ban no-contest clauses in wills as against public policy. A greater number of states allow these measures — also known as “in terrorem” clauses — but rarely enforce them. It seems that the law and its practitioners are reluctant to deny people, even disgruntled heirs, their day in court. And there's that maxim: The law abhors a forfeiture.

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