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Mar 12, 2006 1:03 am

Forgive me if this has been addressed....I am thinking about leaving my firm....is a two week notice customary in this biz or do you just go?

Mar 12, 2006 2:00 am

just hit the road... clean out your personal effects call your manager... tell him this is not working out how you thought and bye bye baby!

Mar 12, 2006 12:45 pm

Before you leave, get ALL your information you need to continue your biz, (assuming you are leaving to join a competitor). Be careful NOT to take ANY original info and leave your records in order so as to not piss off the departed firm. Check your non-compete (if any) and even have an atty. look @ any contracts. If you are simply leaving the biz., a two week notice would be helpful to everyone, (clients and firm).

Mar 12, 2006 4:55 pm

How did your B/D previously handle similar-types of departures from other brokers? That's your biggest clue.


If your B/D cheated the departing brokers out of pay, then you know not to give notice and simply quit the day AFTER you get paid. If you give two week notice, your B/D may decide to cut you loose right then and there.


Good luck!

Mar 13, 2006 10:06 am

I think Revealer has the right idea.  In my opinion, it's pretty simple.  If you are leaving the industry, 2 week's notice is the considerate thing to do.  If you are going to a competitor, you probably won't even be allowed to stay two weeks.  At any rate, assuming this is the case, I would tell management thanks for the opportunity, but it would not be in your or their best interest for you to stay two weeks so you are leaving effective immediately.

Mar 14, 2006 7:03 pm

If you're planning on bringing customers with you, then there are important legal issues involved. Notice may not be a good idea.

1. Ask the branch manager at your new firm how he thinks you should proceed.  I've heard of advisors resigning "effective immediately" at 5:00pm on a Friday and then driving to their new offices and working all weekend transitioning customers.

2. Laws and markets vary from state to state.  Your receiving branch manager is your best source of information on what techniques are most effective for bringing your book with you, HOWEVER:

3. Run anything that he tells you to do by your own lawyer.  Although your receiving branch manager probably knows what he's doing, it's best to get your own legal advice. Recent rulings have made it easier to move your book, but better safe than sorry.

4. Hopefully you have negotiated some competent transition assistance.  Some firms have specialists that will work with you on moving customers effectively.

5. (Shameless plug)  Next time, use a headhunter.  If not me, then somebody.  You should never give your notice without a solid transition plan.  A good headhunter can match you with a firm that will make best use of your book and then walk you through the process.


Mar 14, 2006 11:35 pm

congrats on your smart decision!!!

Mar 15, 2006 12:15 am
JCadieux:

If you're planning on bringing customers with you, then there are important legal issues involved. Notice may not be a good idea.

1. Ask the branch manager at your new firm how he thinks you should proceed.  I've heard of advisors resigning "effective immediately" at 5:00pm on a Friday and then driving to their new offices and working all weekend transitioning customers.

2. Laws and markets vary from state to state.  Your receiving branch manager is your best source of information on what techniques are most effective for bringing your book with you, HOWEVER:

3. Run anything that he tells you to do by your own lawyer.  Although your receiving branch manager probably knows what he's doing, it's best to get your own legal advice. Recent rulings have made it easier to move your book, but better safe than sorry.

4. Hopefully you have negotiated some competent transition assistance.  Some firms have specialists that will work with you on moving customers effectively.

5. (Shameless plug)  Next time, use a headhunter.  If not me, then somebody.  You should never give your notice without a solid transition plan.  A good headhunter can match you with a firm that will make best use of your book and then walk you through the process.




Nice website, but I think you and your boss ought to cut back on the tacos at lunch time.

Mar 15, 2006 1:57 pm
joedabrkr:

Nice website, but I think you and your boss ought to cut back on the tacos at lunch time.


Curiosity got the best of me and I had to look...Joe, you are a riot ...


...I'd best get back on the treadmill before you find a picture of me...

Mar 15, 2006 3:47 pm

Wow, tough taco joke.  

Mar 15, 2006 5:48 pm

Nice plug.

Mar 16, 2006 10:49 am
joedabrkr:



Nice website, but I think you and your boss ought to cut back on the tacos at lunch time.



LOL!   Guilty as charged.  


Mar 16, 2006 4:52 pm
Indyone:
joedabrkr:

Nice website, but I think you and your boss ought to cut back on the tacos at lunch time.


Curiosity got the best of me and I had to look...Joe, you are a riot ...


...I'd best get back on the treadmill before you find a picture of me...



::takes a bow::

Mar 16, 2006 4:54 pm
JCadieux:
joedabrkr:



Nice website, but I think you and your boss ought to cut back on the tacos at lunch time.



LOL!   Guilty as charged.  




Jeff thanks for being such a good sport with my cheap humor.  I just couldn't help myself!

Truth is nobody has EVER accused me of being skinny!!!

Mar 20, 2006 3:17 pm

JCadieux and joedabrkr . . . nice to see two human

beings that are able to poke fun at each other and,

rather than flaming up like my stove the other night

when I left the country ham on too long, laugh at

themselves.