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Jul 29, 2009 5:53 pm

Thanks for the information. Even though EJ looks like a good outfit, there seems to be many firms that offer you control over your book.



If a company is paying you commissions, and not an ongoing salary, it makes no sense to relinquish control of your book. If they gave you a salary and lower commission then I would think otherwise.



I have another question:



Is it better to go with a firm that offers both insurance and financial products?

Jul 29, 2009 6:03 pm
edjgp123:

Geez....I must sure love the kool-aid........lol





FORTUNE

, Jan. 26, 2009

For the 10th year, Edward Jones was named one of the “100



Best Companies to Work For” in America by FORTUNE



magazine in its annual listing. The firm ranked No. 2 overall



and No. 1 on the magazine’s Best Large-sized Company list.



These 10 FORTUNE rankings include top 10 finishes for



seven years and consecutive No. 1 rankings in 2002 and 2003.







"Got to be starting somethin', got to be starting somethin.."

Jul 29, 2009 6:44 pm

LOL Moraen

Jul 29, 2009 8:22 pm
iceco1d:

Jones isn't going to be a good fit for you. You don't own the book, AND they most likely aren't going to let you keep your other business running while you work for them.



Same thing with Wells, Merrill, UBS, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, etc. You are going to want to start with an indy office of Raymond James, LPL, Cambridge, Commonwealth, and RIA, etc.





So, Wells, Merrill and etc., don't let you keep the books?



I looked at the indy's and it seems that they don't have any training. what do you suggest? I was thinking of contacting the regional offices.

Jul 29, 2009 10:33 pm
iceco1d:
Otane:
iceco1d:

Jones isn't going to be a good fit for you.  You don't own the book, AND they most likely aren't going to let you keep your other business running while you work for them. 

 

Same thing with Wells, Merrill, UBS, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, etc.  You are going to want to start with an indy office of Raymond James, LPL, Cambridge, Commonwealth, and RIA, etc.



So, Wells, Merrill and etc., don't let you keep the books?

I looked at the indy's and it seems that they don't have any training. what do you suggest? I was thinking of contacting the regional offices.


"Keeping the book" is a shaky phrase.  People leave Merrill, EDJ, Morgan Stanley, etc. ALL THE TIME.  It's just a matter of how much a hassle the process is, and what you have to do to make the move successful. 


As long as you aren't selling proprietary products, you can move in the future and take at least half your clients (search this forum to get a better idea of what I'm talking about). 


You are correct that none of the indy firms have vast training programs...if you find the right office, perhaps you can find a senior FA that is willing to train you.  You may want to look @ Raymond James, they have several different "channels," maybe one of them would fit you.


Anonymous/Deekay...do you guys know if the insurance b/ds would allow him to keep his current business and become a producer?

 
It works the same as being at any other B/D.  I would imagine it wouldn't be as cut-throat as leaving a wire to go to another firm.  Depending on the insurance company, if you leave the company, you can relinquish your career contract and get a brokerage contract, thus allowing you to continue to service your clients.
Jul 30, 2009 12:41 am

Thanks for the information. It is alot to think about.

Jul 30, 2009 11:49 am

What do you guys know about ICM?