I passed the Series 7 today!

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Jun 6, 2005 10:21 pm

I passed the Series 7 today!  I just had to brag to someone because I am so so so happy!  I just found this website tonight and it is really interesting. 


I am not your typical financial person on this website.  Hell - I'm a computer geek who just happened to get a job working for a successful broker.  My background is in computer science, programming, etc.  Although the majority of my job is computer related, there are times when being registered would be helpful, so I decided to take the series 7, but I wasn't going to lose my job if I didn't pass (thank God!). 


I studied for 4 months off and on and really crammed over the weekend.  It took me about an hour and half to do each section, but I reviewed every single question again which took another hour each session.  I hated re-checking every question, but I was afraid I may not have read the question carefully enough. I did change about 5 answers, who knows if that was a good thing.  I was so nervous throughout the whole exam.  I have to say studying and passing this test was one of the hardest things I have ever done! 


--Andromeda


Jun 6, 2005 10:23 pm

Good for you, Andromeda!  Congratulations on the good work!

Jun 6, 2005 10:40 pm
Starka:

Good for you, Andromeda!  Congratulations on the good work!



HEY STARKA!

Jun 6, 2005 11:25 pm
Andromeda:

I passed the Series 7 today!  I just had to
brag to someone because I am so so so happy!  I just found this
website tonight and it is really interesting. 


I am not your typical financial person on this website.  Hell -
I'm a computer geek who just happened to get a job working for a
successful broker.  My background is in computer science,
programming, etc.  Although the majority of my job is computer
related, there are times when being registered would be
helpful, so I decided to take the series 7, but I wasn't going to
lose my job if I didn't pass (thank God!). 


I studied for 4 months off and on and really crammed over the
weekend.  It took me about an hour and half to do each section,
but I reviewed every single question again which took another hour each
session.  I hated re-checking every question, but I was afraid I
may not have read the question carefully enough. I did change about 5
answers, who knows if that was a good thing.  I was so nervous
throughout the whole exam.  I have to say studying and passing
this test was one of the hardest things I have ever done! 


--Andromeda





Good for you, congrats on a job well done!.



Note that Andromeda is saying that he or she took close to the three
hours allotted to do the test and go back and check their work.



Note that he or she says that they were nervous throughout the test.



Note that he or she says that they studied for several months.



That is how it is done.



It is impossible to do it quickly and it is ridiculous to not take
close to the three hours that you're allowed to use to work
deliberately.  The questions are not as easy as many of the people
who prowl this forum seem to think they were.



Of course they're out there saying, "It was very easy, I finished in half an hour and got a 70%."



If it were easy why didn't they get a 100%?

Jun 6, 2005 11:44 pm
Put Trader:
Andromeda:

I passed the Series 7 today!  I just had to brag to someone because I am so so so happy!  I just found this website tonight and it is really interesting. 


I am not your typical financial person on this website.  Hell - I'm a computer geek who just happened to get a job working for a successful broker.  My background is in computer science, programming, etc.  Although the majority of my job is computer related, there are times when being registered would be helpful, so I decided to take the series 7, but I wasn't going to lose my job if I didn't pass (thank God!). 


I studied for 4 months off and on and really crammed over the weekend.  It took me about an hour and half to do each section, but I reviewed every single question again which took another hour each session.  I hated re-checking every question, but I was afraid I may not have read the question carefully enough. I did change about 5 answers, who knows if that was a good thing.  I was so nervous throughout the whole exam.  I have to say studying and passing this test was one of the hardest things I have ever done! 


--Andromeda




Good for you, congrats on a job well done!.

Note that Andromeda is saying that he or she took close to the three hours allotted to do the test and go back and check their work.

Note that he or she says that they were nervous throughout the test.

Note that he or she says that they studied for several months.

That is how it is done.

It is impossible to do it quickly and it is ridiculous to not take close to the three hours that you're allowed to use to work deliberately.  The questions are not as easy as many of the people who prowl this forum seem to think they were.

Of course they're out there saying, "It was very easy, I finished in half an hour and got a 70%."

If it were easy why didn't they get a 100%?



i took the series 7 on today too.  I finished each section with about an hour and a half left.  I studied on and off for two months, about 3 hours a week.  Didn't feel like rechecking answers.  Got a 86. 

Jun 7, 2005 6:24 am
stillda0nly1:

i took the series 7 on today too.  I
finished each section with about an hour and a half left.  I
studied on and off for two months, about 3 hours a week.  Didn't
feel like rechecking answers.  Got a 86. 





"Didn't feel like rechecking answers" is the sign of a moron.



Morons don't score 86.

Jun 7, 2005 7:04 am

Nice spin Put.  Wrong again.


I studied for about 5 weeks.  I wasn't nervous during the test.  I obviously didn't check my answers and scored an 83.


Morons don't pass the series 7.  He ain't a moron.

Jun 7, 2005 7:04 am

What DO you morons score, Put?

Jun 7, 2005 7:58 am
Starka:

What DO you morons score, Put?





If they're lucky, between 70 and 75.



Tell me Starka, do you think it's a sign of intellectual maturity to say, "Didn't feel like double checking my answers?"



I can understand, "Didn't think I needed to double check my answers"
but slacker morons are the types who say things like, "Didn't feel like
double checking my answers."



But what do I know, I've only watching NASD exam results for about
twenty years and have formed my opinions on only about 10,000 such
reports.

Jun 7, 2005 8:03 am
menotellname:

Nice spin Put.  Wrong again.


I studied for about 5 weeks.  I wasn't nervous during the test.  I obviously didn't check my answers and scored an 83.


Morons don't pass the series 7.  He ain't a moron.





Sure they do.  They luck into 70s and 71s, often on their second try.



For the boys and girls who have not yet taken this test.  It's
crazy, as in CRAZY, to say that you won't be nervous.  Especially
if you are going to be fired if you fail.



I am aware of a handful of people who actually came unglued during the
test--fainting, vomitting, one actually got up and went running out in
tears.



Also isn't it curious that the national average is 75 or so yet every
testosterone driven jerk on this forum claims to have gotten higher
than 85, didn't review, wasn't nervous and did three question a minute.



Can we all say, "Yeah, right!"

Jun 7, 2005 8:05 am

Intellectual maturity?  I have my own opinion there as well.  You see, while you're spending your time reading 10,000 reports, I've been working with active brokers. 


Naturally, my take is somewhat different from yours.  But as you've so rightly observed, what do you know?

Jun 7, 2005 8:10 am
Starka:

Intellectual maturity?  I have my own opinion
there as well.  You see, while you're spending your time reading
10,000 reports, I've been working with active brokers. 


Naturally, my take is somewhat different from yours.  But as you've so rightly observed, what do you know?





Tell me something.  Why do you soldiers continually insist that your commanders don't know what it's like to be a soldier?



I was in production for six years--is that not enough time to learn
what it's like to be in production?  Is that not enough time to
learn what it's like to "smile and dial" or conduct a seminar?



That you have been in production for a few years, but know nothing
about the rest of the business does not trump my experience of being in
production for a number of years and also rotating into and out of a
series of other jobs.



Get back with me when you've been around for thirty years at the branch, regional and home-office levels.

Jun 7, 2005 8:45 am

Wow.  Six whole years, huh? 


Regarding your quaint military analogy, you should know that real commanders must earn respect, and from you've posted to date, frankly, you don't know how.


Get back to me when you know the meaning of intellectual maturity, integrity and yes, respect for the individual.  I fear that will take much longer than thirty years.

Jun 7, 2005 8:52 am
Starka:

Wow.  Six whole years, huh? 


Regarding your quaint military analogy, you should know that real commanders must earn respect, and from you've posted to date, frankly, you don't know how.


Get back to me when you know the meaning of intellectual maturity,
integrity and yes, respect for the individual.  I fear that will
take much longer than thirty years.





I repeat, is six years not long enough to learn what it's like to be in production?



Tell me again about your regional office experience.  How about at the home office, what did you do there?



Nothing?  You mean you're still doing the same entry level work you did when you broke into the business?  How sad.



As for respect for the individual.  Is that what is being
displayed towards me, or is respect a one way street in your world?

Jun 7, 2005 8:57 am

I started by showing you respect, but you made it clear that you were and still are undeserving of the same.


As to experience, are you still in the same field that you started your career in?  How very sad.  Still, as you couldn't cut it in production, it's nice that your masters found something for you to do where you couldn't hurt those who do the real work.


Look kid, this can go on all day, but I have work to do.  I realize that it's an alien concept to a military brat, but some of us actually do something constructive all day.


See you in the funny papers, Loser!

Jun 7, 2005 9:13 am
Starka:

As to experience, are you still in the same field that you started
your career in?  How very sad.  Still, as you couldn't cut it
in production, it's nice that your masters found something for you to
do where you couldn't hurt those who do the real work.





Same field?  You mean investments, Wall Street?  Yep, I
freely admit that I spent a lifetime accepting increasingly responsible
positions on Wall Street all the way from a local branch, through the
regional staff, to the home office.  Moving when asked to
move--the whole nine yards.



It would be fun to read why you think that is not something I should have done.



Another weird theme in your curious thoughts is that those of us who
are offered a chance to lead accept those challenges because we were
unable to do the work of those we are asked to lead.



I won a trip to Europe with my wife in my second year in production,
and won accolades such as President's Club or Chairman's Council every
year until I accepted the challenges of leadership.



It would be fun to read why you think that is a sign of failure.



Finally the disdain for my father's career choice.  It would be
fun to read how the children of successful military officers suffer due
to their father's success.



You seem like a cornucopia of odd ball ideas, what fun it would be to uncover them--much like unwrapping a golf ball.

Jun 7, 2005 9:22 am

Well you see, stupid, I too had a successful military career.  Additionally, I didn't need my father's success to define mine.


Despite your "successes", if indeed they actually happened, you're still a Loser to me.

Jun 7, 2005 9:29 am
Starka:

Well you see, stupid, I too had a successful
military career.  Additionally, I didn't need my father's success
to define mine.



Used my father's success to define my own?  When?  Where?  How?



You're the one who seems to think that being a "Military Brat" is a handicap.  It would be fun to read how and why that is.




Jun 7, 2005 10:17 am

C'mon now, Put.  Surely you don't expect anyone to believe that one as ignorant as you has reached the lofty perch that you claim without any help from your betters!

Jun 7, 2005 10:22 am
Starka:

C'mon now, Put.  Surely you don't expect anyone to
believe that one as ignorant as you has reached the lofty perch that
you claim without any help from your betters!





Ignorant?  OF what?