How do I secure an interview for UBS?

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Aug 7, 2007 12:54 am

I just applied for a clerical internship at UBS through my school's website (it's probably all paperwork and data entry stuff), but any experience can be turned into a good one. I'm positive I meet all the qualifications, but I'm sure the advisor has about 100 resumes to look at since our college is quite big. Last time an opportunity like this came up, the position was filled in about 2 days. I know a good rule of thumb is to wait 2-3 days after submitting my resume to call the recruiter, BUT in this case, would it be wise to call the day after? My pitch usually goes


"Hello X, my name is X, I go to X school and am currently majoring in Business Economics. I have worked at Washington Mutual, State Farm and currently an indy LPL firm. I have had experience in cold calling, sales, MS Word and Excel so I do believe I can perform well at your internship position. I do plan on going into financial advising after graduation (preferably UBS) so I think this internship program would be a great experience. Is it possible to set up an in-person interview sometime this week, or if you're too busy, possibly a phone interview?"


how's that pitch? any ideas on how I can REALLY capture this advisor's attention. I just want one interview shot i guess.

Aug 7, 2007 1:24 am

I'm confused.  I thought you wanted to be a financial advisor.  I thought you wanted to be in sales.  Why are you going to waste your time with another internship?  You graduate in December, so your internship would last 3-3.5 months?  I'm sure you could find a part time sales job and actually meet people in your community instead.  Wouldn't that be more meaningful to you...to try to have some good contacts to go to when you actually get in the business?


I was in your same situation, sort of, when I was in college back in the day.  I too was graduating in December and had no classes for the last semester.  I took a sales job and kicked butt in it.  I always wanted to be at the top in sales.  Then as I was graduating I went to ML, resume in hand, asked for the sales manager, shook his hand, introduced myself, and was hired soon after.  The director of the office specifically asked to see how I compared to other salespeople at my sales job.  It was good to have on the resume even though it wasn't for a long time.  That being said, had I done an internship, I would not have been better off.  I probably would have been worse off because I made a ton of connections, and learned to never take no for an answer.  I could've probably even waited an extra year or two before getting into this business, but it's a learn as you go process.


If you are dead set on interning at UBS, why don't you just call him to follow up with the resume you sent to ensure he received it, then just act normal.  He'll be willing to meet if he's looking for an intern.  Just be conversational and let him know how hard you are willing to work to help him accomplish anything he might need.


If you were a hot college girl it would be a lot easier for you.

Aug 7, 2007 1:48 am
snaggletooth:

I'm confused.  I thought you wanted to be a financial advisor.  I thought you wanted to be in sales.  Why are you going to waste your time with another internship?  You graduate in December, so your internship would last 3-3.5 months?  I'm sure you could find a part time sales job and actually meet people in your community instead.  Wouldn't that be more meaningful to you...to try to have some good contacts to go to when you actually get in the business?


I was in your same situation, sort of, when I was in college back in the day.  I too was graduating in December and had no classes for the last semester.  I took a sales job and kicked butt in it.  I always wanted to be at the top in sales.  Then as I was graduating I went to ML, resume in hand, asked for the sales manager, shook his hand, introduced myself, and was hired soon after.  The director of the office specifically asked to see how I compared to other salespeople at my sales job.  It was good to have on the resume even though it wasn't for a long time.  That being said, had I done an internship, I would not have been better off.  I probably would have been worse off because I made a ton of connections, and learned to never take no for an answer.  I could've probably even waited an extra year or two before getting into this business, but it's a learn as you go process.


If you are dead set on interning at UBS, why don't you just call him to follow up with the resume you sent to ensure he received it, then just act normal.  He'll be willing to meet if he's looking for an intern.  Just be conversational and let him know how hard you are willing to work to help him accomplish anything he might need.


If you were a hot college girl it would be a lot easier for you.



Yes, actually I am graduating in December, but I figured since my indy LPL firm is rather flexible with the hours, I might as well work both firms to meet as many advisors as I can to absord knowledge/techniques. I mean I don't think it can hurt to even learn the computer software.

Aug 7, 2007 2:57 am
Aug 7, 2007 11:21 am

Selling yourself to the wires to get hired will be a lot easier than convincing 50 somethings to let you manage their money.  Just remember: It'll be a bitch but it is doable.  Read the "500 day war" over and over and over (and over).


As for interning, it might make your skin a little thicker because all you'll do in make cc's.  You should really try to get on a team as a sales assistant. 


As a sales assistant, you'll be able to study for 7, 66, etc.  Firm will probably pay for it, I know ML did for CAs.  You'll learn how the system works.  Hell, you may even be able to sit in on client meetings to see how it's done.  As time goes by, and you end up getting licensed, the team may have you work their dead assets.  Who knows they may even take you on as a partner after a while.


I think that, at your age, a sales assistant job may be the best way to go.


My two cents. 


Snaggletooth's right though, you'd have a better chance at an internship if you were blonde with big'ns.  Plus, you won't get paid for interning, and Joe's right NASD won't let you work for two firms.

Aug 7, 2007 12:21 pm
pretzelhead:

As for interning, it might make your skin a little thicker because all you'll do in make cc's.  You should really try to get on a team as a sales assistant. 

As a sales assistant, you'll be able to study for 7, 66, etc.  Firm will probably pay for it, I know ML did for CAs.  You'll learn how the system works.  Hell, you may even be able to sit in on client meetings to see how it's done.  As time goes by, and you end up getting licensed, the team may have you work their dead assets.  Who knows they may even take you on as a partner after a while.


I think that, at your age, a sales assistant job may be the best way to go.


My two cents.


That's my advice also.  Even if you start on the servicing side and not so much in sales, the closer you get to a successful advisor the better, even if you ultimately switch firms.


Also curious as to why you think you can't pursue this with your current LPL mentors?  If it's because you feel you're being used, I doubt if that changes wherever you go.  Initially, you WILL be used to do the things no one else wants to do or has time to do.  Once you have a chance to show your stripes a bit, you should gradually get more responsibility and more interesting assignments.


If you have no chemistry with your current mentors/employers, then I understand your desire to branch out.  If on the other hand, it's solely because they want you to graduate first, I think you're pushing too hard.  Focus on completing your education and working your internship.  If you have any additional time, you can start studying for the series seven.  Life's a marathon and I think you're trying to sprint.