How to become a Stock Broker?

or Register to post new content in the forum

18 RepliesJump to last post

 

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Apr 15, 2007 8:46 am

Hey, think this is an American forum but maybe you can help me anyway. I've used the search feature quickly but sorry if this topic has been posted before.

I'm an 18 year old who's nearly finished A-Levels with a predicted B grade in Economics. I've applied to University in Nottingham but not too keen on the idea of Uni and would much prefer to get an apprenticeship as a Stock Broker. Ive been interested in Finance for a while. I know this is quite a broad question but what is the right way to becoming a Stock Broker? and what are the certain qualifications needed? Any advice or help would be much appreciated. Thanks 

Apr 15, 2007 9:32 am

Get a 4 year degree and then obtain sponsorship for the Series 7 exam (stock broker). To get sponsorship you need to be employed by a Broker Dealer (Merril, AG Edward, Edward Jones, Fidelity etc...).

Apr 15, 2007 10:18 am

You can become a broker without a degree, but I'd highly recommend that you complete your degree first and then get into the business.


Many, many, many people fail in this field, and if you're one of those (I sincerely hope not), your transition to another field will be much smoother with a university degree. 


You'll also gain credibility by having your diploma displayed behind your office desk.

Apr 15, 2007 11:32 am

Ducky, borker I believe has good intentions. He brought up the many many people fail, BS. Then gave no solution, just the old go to school answer. College does not and will not make you successful in this biz. You can hang all the diploma's up you want if you can not ask for the order.  Best advice is do get a job  while you are in school where you must ask for business and maybe get commission or a bonus for the sale. It does NOT have to be related to the finance field. 


Borker, then send him one of those Rainbow Coalition approved postcards.

Apr 15, 2007 1:08 pm
duckyduck:

Hey, think this is an American forum but maybe you can
help me anyway. I've used the search feature quickly but sorry if this
topic has been posted before.





This is an american forum, I doubt anyone here has a clue about being a stockbroker in England.

Apr 22, 2007 5:54 pm

am an mba student with some business background (banking)


 what should I know before pursuing this career field


and are there different areas to specialize in? (stockbroker; planner, advisor - differences?)


sign me:


Ms. Investigator of Career Interests


[email protected]

Apr 22, 2007 7:02 pm
parachute:

am an mba student with some business background (banking)


 what should I know before pursuing this career field


and are there different areas to specialize in? (stockbroker; planner, advisor - differences?)


sign me:


Ms. Investigator of Career Interests


[email protected]



Lose weight and never cut your hair short. Can anyone else think of anything?

Apr 22, 2007 8:19 pm

For sure get your degree....



The bottom line is you want options. Come into this field and fail, which happens to 90% of the new brokers, and then what are you going to put on your resume.



Yeah, sure you could always go back and get a degree when your 30 but that sucks. Now at the same time be smart and go cheep. Go to community college, then state school and save 50k. Life is so nice without debt.



Either way... There is a reason that college grads make 20k per year more then their piers... Why professional degrees make 40k per year more then their piers... A degree does matter, but don't get cought up with the name of the school...

Apr 22, 2007 9:05 pm
AirForce:

For sure get your degree....

The bottom line is you want options. Come into this field and fail, which happens to 90% of the new brokers, and then what are you going to put on your resume.

Yeah, sure you could always go back and get a degree when your 30 but that sucks. Now at the same time be smart and go cheep. Go to community college, then state school and save 50k. Life is so nice without debt.

Either way... There is a reason that college grads make 20k per year more then their piers... Why professional degrees make 40k per year more then their piers... A degree does matter, but don't get cought up with the name of the school...


Cheap,peers and caught. Wow I never graduated college and I could spell better than that by sixth grade.

Apr 26, 2007 9:29 am

Just a stock broker?  Just trading stocks? 

Apr 29, 2007 3:44 am

Much like the original poster, I've decided to try and become a stockbroker. However, I'm 22, and I've wasted all of my "free" college money after high school a pursuing a completely unrelated degree, in which I have no interest anymore. So, right now I spend everyday studying the workings of the securities markets, both online and from a few books I ordered. In a way, I find it much more efficient, financially, obviously, and as far as my personal productivity. I'm more focused every night sitting in front of my computer than I'd be if I were sitting in a classroom at 9am after rolling out of bed. Maybe I'm getting too confident, a degree would be nice but, at the moment, it's just not an option for me.

So I guess I'd just like to hear from a few of those who have made it, if my plan has some real potential. And that is:

- Study my ass off for the next 6-12 months to the point where I know basically everything there is to know about securities.

- Contact a number of firms in hopes of finding one that will look past my lack of a college degree, and obtain a trainee position.

- Make a good impression on the firm's management with an extensive knowledge of the industry and a winning attitude.

- Pass the Series 7 with a score well above 90.

- Get hired.

Apr 29, 2007 6:50 am

Tyashley,


I admire your determination, but you are completely off base.


1) Get a job in outside sales.


2) Use this money to get a degree.


3) Become a stockbroker

Apr 29, 2007 8:04 am
TyAshley:

Much like the original poster, I've decided to try and become a stockbroker. However, I'm 22, and I've wasted all of my "free" college money after high school a pursuing a completely unrelated degree, in which I have no interest anymore. So, right now I spend everyday studying the workings of the securities markets, both online and from a few books I ordered. In a way, I find it much more efficient, financially, obviously, and as far as my personal productivity. I'm more focused every night sitting in front of my computer than I'd be if I were sitting in a classroom at 9am after rolling out of bed. Maybe I'm getting too confident, a degree would be nice but, at the moment, it's just not an option for me.

So I guess I'd just like to hear from a few of those who have made it, if my plan has some real potential. And that is:

- Study my ass off for the next 6-12 months to the point where I know basically everything there is to know about securities.

- Contact a number of firms in hopes of finding one that will look past my lack of a college degree, and obtain a trainee position.

- Make a good impression on the firm's management with an extensive knowledge of the industry and a winning attitude.

- Pass the Series 7 with a score well above 90.

- Get hired.


This is not the job for you. I day traded for the past two years prior to taking my new job, I learned a lot about technical analysis and fundamentals. When I decided that I wanted to enter the securities industry as a "stock broker" I quickly realized that my ability to read charts doesn't mean squat. In every one of the interviews I had with four different firms none of them asked about my trading. They all wanted to know about my sales experience, which fortunately I had. The last thing these firms want is someone who sits around all day watching stocks. If you want to be an analyst I suggest that you complete your degree and get a CFA designation. If you spend enough time researching this profession you will quickly come to the same conclusion.

Apr 29, 2007 8:41 am

I rarely post here but I do want to say that 1234 is right on the money. Besides being an analyst, sales is the name of the game. It doesn't matter if you know the market like the back of your hand and your a straight A student or received +90 on the series 7. For firms, 70=100. It doesn't matter. If you can sell, they can hire you. <?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />


If you still are skeptical, read Registered Rep (or any other magazine). You won’t read: "The broker who received 90 on the series 7..." or "the 4.0 GPA graduate..." What you would read is "$150mm under management..." and all the other things pertaining to his/her book.


*For the record, good grades MAY get you an interview, doesn't mean you get the job. My advice to you is get yourself a sales job while you study. If you can maintain just decent grades and work in a sales job, it shows multi-tasking which is highly valued in this business. Managers prefer to higher someone with a 2.8 GPA but worked in a job at the same time than a 3.8GPA that just studied.


Sep 8, 2010 12:59 pm

Hi,

Anyone with commerece or economic background can become a stock broker. if you have and specislize course related to it then it would be better for future growth.

Regards,

sarah_9

World Market

Sep 8, 2010 1:09 pm

This thread is a hoot. Not sure whether to scream, cry, or laugh....

Sep 8, 2010 7:00 pm

Wow another skill drain beatdown thread

The kid has higher aspirations than dropping out and working in burger king not everybody has the money / education intelligence to even pass college so for them it may not even be an OPTION

Any brokerage firm seems to hire you as long as you are not some sloppy ass who they think will not come into work everyday

if one has a  good work ethic a will to succeed and they put their all into it (especially during series 7/63 prep) they will be fine.

Prior sales experience is a plus though.

Some firms give you leads so building up a client base is a little more simple.

Best of luck to you OP follow your dream do NOT listen to anyone else.

Your at a young age where ANYTHING in terms of a career can be tried due to you not having a family and responsibilities

Sep 8, 2010 9:15 pm

Since you are from Norway, you should probably do yourself a favor and apply for a free bachelor degree at the Copenhagen Business School. If you are a Norwegian citizen it won't cost you a dime and you will have a degree in economics/business administration after 3 years.

http://www.cbs.dk