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May 3, 2007 3:03 pm

Hey all. As the subject of this post would indicate, I've recently begun training at EJ. Regardless of your opinion of the firm e.g. Jones sucks, Jones is awesome, etc., is there anyone out there, current employee or former, who could shed some light on some of the aspects of working for EJ? What's your salary, how long did it take to get there, why did you leave/why have you stayed, etc...

May 3, 2007 3:24 pm

Welcome aboard...there's literally thousands of posts relating to your question already here for your browsing pleasure.  Simply click on the search button in the upper righthand corner and type in some key words "Edward Jones great" "Edward Jones sucks" "EDJ" "Doug Hill", etc.,etc.,etc.  You get the picture.  The longest thread I've found on here, some 70+ pages of posts relates directly to Edward Jones.  You'll also find plenty of spirited debate in most Jones threads.  Finally, you might also search by poster for different viewpoints on Jones.  Spaceman Spiff, Broker 24, Incredible Hulk, and Maxstud are all current Jones employees (I think) and satisfied with the firm (I think).  Folks like uwec86, bspears, footsoldier, freefromjones, and edj4now can give you an opposing viewpoint.  Again, simply use the search function and search by poster.


Good luck with your career...it's tough at first with a low success rate, but if you get over the hump, it's very hard to beat for job satisfaction and compensation.

May 3, 2007 3:57 pm

Indyone, thanks for the leads. I'll do my research and jump on a discussion from there...

May 3, 2007 8:48 pm

Naq, just work hard and keep doing something. Anytime you don't know

what to do, just go introduce yourself to a local business owner. Never

stop moving, never stop calling, never stop your activity. And just don't

worry about the EDJ vs. EDJ Sucks camps. For the first few years, it makes

little difference where you work. Don't get caught up in the EDJ pros/

cons, why people left, etc yet. It will only distract you. You will have the

rest of your career to worry about that. Just set the right foundation and

work habits and you'll be off to the races.



In the very beginning, just do what they tell you. Do the doorknocking,

make the calls, etc. Get as many people in your pipeline as possible. But

start networking, teaching classes, doing seminars, etc as quickly as

possible. Jones won't teach you much about that other stuff, so you need

to be proactive and do it yourself (I found many good ideas on this

board). If there are a lot of businesses in your area, get to know them

(early and often). If you don't, you will regret it three years from now

(they are available during the day, and they have money and needs).



Just remember, most of the anti-Jones stuff applies more to those out a

few years or more. DON'T get caught up in it yet. Oh yeah, make sure

you have money tucked away and you curb your spending. It will make

the first few years bearable.



Good luck, PM me if you have specific questions.

May 3, 2007 10:00 pm
Broker24:

Oh yeah, make sure you have money tucked away and you curb your spending. It will make the first few years bearable.


If you don't pay attention to anything else, pay attention to the above statement. My salary ended a while back with Jones, and now what was once a good month in terms of production/income is now a month that barely provides the income to enable me to pay my bills.


I'm now making less than when I was a state trooper, and I didn't think that was possible.


May 3, 2007 10:48 pm

Here's a good idea.... Quit

May 3, 2007 10:51 pm
Borker Boy:
Broker24:

Oh yeah, make sure you have money tucked away and you curb your spending. It will make the first few years bearable.



If you don't pay attention to anything else, pay attention to the above statement. My salary ended a while back with Jones, and now what was once a good month in terms of production/income is now a month that barely provides the income to enable me to pay my bills.



I'm now making less than when I was a state trooper, and I didn't think that was possible.







This means your making about the same as a busboy at Denny's? How can you provide unbiased financial advice? Here is something successful people get either it works or it doesn't. Are you bringing in business at a rate that will make you VERY successful? No. NEXT.

May 4, 2007 8:51 am

Naqoyqatsi,


You'll find a sorts of advice from many different characters on this board.  As you can probably tell from my name, I used to be at Jones but no longer am. I left Jones and became independent because that's what was right for me. I am happy that Jones gave me a chance to get started and that I walked down that road.  I'm also glad that I took a different path when the opportunity presented itself.  Knock yourself out, work hard, and if you choose to stay with Jones your entire career, do it and do it right.  If you get tired at some point making less money than a bus boy at Denny's as referenced above, get the heck out and take care of yourself.  The GP's and the regional leaders, when it comes down to the bottom line, won't.  They care about their business and their pocketbook.  There are things you'll learn along the way that you weren't told when you were hired.  If you can work through the things you'll find out about and still want to work at Jones, do it!!  Just keep your eyes and ears open.  And whatever you do, DON'T DRINK THE KOOLAID!!

May 4, 2007 8:55 am

Bringing in business/assets and being able to invest that money in a manner that provides good commissions is two different issues.


I think I'm probably making more than a busboy, but I'm not positive.


And, yes, I'm finding that a job where income is derived from 100% commissions can really test a person's integrity and creates a HUGE conflict of interest. 


It's imperative that we all give unbiased advice (to maintain what little credibility we have), but being able to feed my family is fairly important.




May 4, 2007 9:30 am
Borker Boy:

And, yes, I'm finding that a job where income is derived from 100% commissions can really test a person's integrity and creates a HUGE conflict of interest. 

It's imperative that we all give unbiased advice (to maintain what little credibility we have), but being able to feed my family is fairly important.



As Shakespeare said, 'Therein lies the rub...."


One good things about Jones on this front is that they will teach you how to sell and prospect and keep things simple.  One big negative is that they are not very big on teaching you how to structure your business so that you do not have to constantly seek new assets merely to survive.  And then there are the other "revenue maximization strategies" I wished I'd learned years ago.


One suggestion I will share-something I wished I'd learned years ago.  Try to keep your book of business very simple.  Go through all the investment options in front of you(that you like) and narrow things down to a fairly small set of choices so that when a moderate risk investor comes to you with a 65000 IRA you know exactly what you're going to do for them, and it will likely be the same as what you did for an 85,000 or 50,000 moderate risk investment last month.  Or maybe, at least narrow down your inventory to a family of 'building blocks' that you can mix and match to build more customized solutions.

The more you can simplify like this the better it will be for you and your clients (and your family).  IT will allow you to become more proficient at selling that smaller family of products and be able to monitor their performance more closely going forward.  It will also make you more efficient and thus leave more time and energy for selling and prospecting related activities.


Asset allocation funds such as those from accessor(accessor.com) or MFS or Oppy are especially useful in this regard for accounts under a certain threshold, say 50k or 100k.

This seems like such a simple and obvious idea, but some people never learn to do it.  After all, it's human nature to always look for the newest and best idea.  Plus, the "product distribution" model of MOST b/d's works against this concept....after all, there's always another wholesaler who wants to drop by and buy you lunch and tell you about HIS asset allocation/large cap value/high yield product.  Resist the temptation.

May 4, 2007 10:38 am

Great advice. Keep it streamlined. Do your diligence and establish an investment matrix (whether its MF's for accounts under $500K, SMA's for over 500K, ETF's, etc) and adhere to it. Learn the managers and follow them closely. If their is underperfomance or a manager leaves, you are able to make a change across the board. By following 20-40 funds instead of 125, you are able to more effectively prospect for new business, do client events, etc...


Good luck.

May 4, 2007 1:05 pm
Borker Boy:

And, yes, I'm finding that a job where income
is derived from 100% commissions can really test a
person's integrity and creates a HUGE conflict of interest. 

It's imperative that we all give unbiased advice (to maintain what
little credibility we have), but being able to feed my family is fairly important.


I think Op will save himself if he learns the old 2/2/2 method.
Which is to use two fund families, buy two stocks, and buy two bonds.


I'd work at familiarising myself with funds that are not on the preferred list. I.e do not be a GFA slave.


If you learn nothing else from Academic finance, do not buy growth stocks/funds, Value stocks only!


Learn to read the companies research reports so that you have something insightful to say at all times.

May 4, 2007 1:09 pm
joedabrkr:


This seems like such a simple and obvious idea, but some people
never learn to do it.  After all, it's human nature to always look
for the newest and best idea.  Plus, the "product distribution"
model of MOST b/d's works against this concept....after all, there's
always another wholesaler who wants to drop by and buy you lunch and
tell you about HIS asset allocation/large cap value/high yield
product.  Resist the temptation.





Yes, the one shot target date or target risk funds are the way to go
for smaller accounts. Don't forget to try and steal bank deposits via
brokered CD's



I would also ignore the siren call of high yeild and (floating rate
income) funds.  That is simply not appropraite for people who need
steady income. The risk of junk credits has been masked, but when
conditions revert to normal, it will be most impressive.

May 4, 2007 3:22 pm

develop a niche/target market, and go after it. place all the assets you raise your 1st year in upfront commission products. wait until you have $10mill in assets before you start using wrap accounts.


May 5, 2007 2:16 pm
Borker Boy:

If you don't pay attention to anything else, pay attention to the above statement. My salary ended a while back with Jones, and now what was once a good month in terms of production/income is now a month that barely provides the income to enable me to pay my bills.


I'm now making less than when I was a state trooper, and I didn't think that was possible.



Borker, if I was a new Jones guy, your posts would make me nervous. A few months back, you were saying how great Jones is, how you took over a nice size office, you even said that a Jones IR in a small town can live like a big city lawyer.  In the past few weeks, you have said you were thinking of quitting and going back to law enforcement, and you're making no money. Well, what's up? 


Do you see yourself at Jones in five years?


For all of you Jones kool-aid drinkers who have been following this, you have witnessed the lightbulb beginning to turn on for Borker.   It turned on for me after my salary dropped off, and I started going into debt.  Even when I had good months, my take home amount was pitiful.  This board was the tipping point for me to leave Jones.


I still think Jones is a good place to start, it's just not all that the recruiting department (and RLs) make it out to be.

May 5, 2007 3:47 pm
Vin Diesel:

develop a niche/target market, and go after it. place all the assets you raise your 1st year in upfront commission products. wait until you have $10mill in assets before you start using wrap accounts.




If he does that how will he make a living when he starts putting more assets into wrap products?  He'll have very little in the way of trails to speak of.

Seems to me to make more sense to put at least a modest percentage of your clients into wrap products right from the start to build up the recurring revenue base.

May 5, 2007 3:58 pm
now_indy:

For all of you Jones kool-aid drinkers who have been
following this, you have witnessed the lightbulb beginning to turn on
for Borker.   It turned on for me after my salary
dropped off, and I started going into debt.





This is where my name comes from. During the paid portion of my
employment I put all my spare cash into REITs so I would have something
to fall back on. It simply takes a long time to build the right sort of book and you can starve while doing so.



EDJ would be very smart if they changed the payout on A-share trails to
be 80%. This would result in a longer tailed income stream for brokers.



Even the long awaited move to wrap accounts (i.e turning the battle
ship) won't help much. Assuming a 75bp fee on E-share wrap accounts ,
at 45% payout == 33bp to the FA. In order to have $70,000 in take home
pay, you'd have to have upwards of $22 AUM.



The existing scheme basicly means you start from scratch each month, just like Sisyphus.

May 5, 2007 4:36 pm
AllREIT:

The existing scheme basicly means you start from scratch each month, just like Sisyphus.


Yes! Sisyphus. That is exactly the kind of employee Jones is looking for.

May 6, 2007 12:14 am
AllREIT:





The existing scheme basicly means you start from scratch each month, just like Sisyphus.



A powerful and accurate metahpor, sir!

May 6, 2007 9:57 am

Thank you all for the advice. I'm sure I'll be getting in touch from
time to time as my training progresses and issues come up. Everyone
that I've spoken with at Jones so far has not sugar coated how
difficult it can be starting out, especially in the first two years.
But there also making great money, some after only 3-4 years, so I'm beginning to think there has to be something they're doing right that other Jones reps maybe aren't? Can't just be luck or the town they decided to work in can it?

Maybe it'll be a career, or maybe I'll learn the ropes and go solo
after while. Who knows.



One  more quick one. Does anyone here know anybody in this field of
work who is also in the National Guard or Reserve? Jones hired me
knowing that I have such a commitment, and I was wondering what happens
to a guy when he comes back after being deployed for say, 18 months?