Financial Publications

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Apr 25, 2007 6:36 pm

I wanted to ask what financial publications you all read regularly and/or subscribe to?


Obviously keeping on top of current events is important to conveying to your clients that you know what you're doing, so which publications (websites even?) would be the best for a newbie to start reading on a regular basis?

Apr 25, 2007 6:42 pm

Read Barron's. Every SUN I cruise down to the newstand and grab the latest issue. A ton of great reads, interesting editorials on the markets, politics, market events, etc...


While there is a TON of information, you will learn quickly which articles and data are of interest to you. Plus, it always looks good sitting on your desk when clients drop by...

Apr 25, 2007 7:01 pm
kap39:

I wanted to ask what financial publications you all read regularly and/or subscribe to?


Obviously keeping on top of current events is important to conveying to your clients that you know what you're doing, so which publications (websites even?) would be the best for a newbie to start reading on a regular basis?



Well, OBVIOUSLY Registered Rep Magazine!!  LOL  Plus I look at On Wall Street, Financial Planning Mag and the WSJ

Apr 25, 2007 8:21 pm

Investors Business Daily. Its a pretty quick read and I believe if you go onto their website you can get a free trial subscription.

Apr 25, 2007 8:59 pm

I peruse Barron's (online) as it comes with my WSJ subscription. Although their reco's (IMO) have not been worthwhile and I generally utilize them to scan the MF performance tables (YTD). 


For me, the holy grail has been Briefing.com. Absolutely tremendous with regard to macro market calls and individual stock ideas.  I've made more $ for clients following them than anyone else.

May 1, 2007 9:14 am

In order of priority...


1. Wall Street Journal


2. Google News


3. Journal of Wealth Management


4. Registered Rep


5. Investment News


6. Economist

May 1, 2007 9:53 am

Investors Business Daily, Barron's, and Drudge.  Don't laugh - Drudge is probably the best source for global, current events.

May 1, 2007 12:23 pm

Thanks to all for the feedback I officially start my training on June 4th and want to start getting up to speed with everything going on, so now I have plenty of homework to do!!

May 1, 2007 2:39 pm

I like to read Playboy and the SI Swimsuit issue. Lot's of great articles to discuss with my clients.


On another note: Does anyone know a good way to break into the female market?


May 1, 2007 3:43 pm
EDJ to RIA:

I like to read Playboy and the SI Swimsuit issue. Lot's of great articles to discuss with my clients.


On another note: Does anyone know a good way to break into the female market?




I can't even break into a females bedroom.

May 1, 2007 4:17 pm

Business Week.

May 1, 2007 4:27 pm
vbrainy:

Business Week.





Google News.



More seriously, I carefully avoid most of the financial porn out there.
I.e (CNBC, WSJ, barrons, the various money magazines etc)



I do read the New Yorker, Commentary, The Economist, The Atlantic, and Harper's since alot of my clients read those magazines.

May 1, 2007 5:09 pm

Obviously I read Reg Rep, I can't live without my WSJ.

May 2, 2007 4:56 pm

dealbreaker.com and yahoo finance

May 2, 2007 5:09 pm

"More seriously, I carefully avoid most of the financial porn out there. I.e (CNBC, WSJ, barrons, the various money magazines etc)"


You would classify Barrons and the Journal in the same camp as Money, Kiplinger, and the like? I think the latter mags are the definatition of financial porn, but Barrons and WSJ have loads of useful info for advisors to sift throuh..

May 2, 2007 5:42 pm
blarmston:

"More seriously, I carefully avoid most of the
financial porn out there. I.e (CNBC, WSJ, barrons, the various money
magazines etc)"


You would classify Barrons and the Journal in the same camp as
Money, Kiplinger, and the like? I think the latter mags are the
definatition of financial porn, but Barrons and WSJ have loads of
useful info for advisors to sift throuh..





Barron's/WSJ are the Nerve magazine of finance. Titillation for people who think. I'd still avoid reading them too much, since too much thinking about investments can be dangerious.




May 2, 2007 6:56 pm

"Barron's/WSJ are the Nerve magazine of finance. Titillation for people who think. I'd still avoid reading them too much, since too much thinking about investments can be dangerious."

This from the guy who just spent 19 hours of his life the past 2 days arguing with Mikey B about indexing....

May 2, 2007 7:20 pm
AllREIT:

...... too much thinking about investments can be dangerious.



I wouldn't mention that you feel that way about you thinking too much about their investments.

May 2, 2007 9:47 pm

I don't like (show me the) Money or Kiplingers, but I'll confess to getting some pretty doggone good stock ideas from Smart Money (like PCU - purchased 1/4/07 at 49.65/shr), which I believe is put out by the WSJ people.  I also like to browse Barrons and the industry freebies like RRMag and On Wall Street.  There's some very good stuff out there that costs nothing but your time to read.

May 3, 2007 4:37 am
mikebutler222:

I wouldn't mention that you feel that way about you thinking too much about their investments.





I do, I tell clients that I try to set up investments that require as
little supervision as possible. Things that need constant supervision
can blow up on you. My mission is to stay as level headed as possible under all circumstances.



That's why I set up passive core equity/bond portfolio's and then focus
my efforts on activly managing a REIT/BDC portfolio. There is enough
meshuggas in that to keep anyone happy.



Investing is remarkably similar to poker, you want to avoid too much
distraction and you want to stay away from anything too emotional. Emotions are a good friend of bad decisions.