New Suits

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Jan 23, 2008 3:04 am
Spaceman Spiff:

Noggin - I had a visiting vet tell me years ago that he takes a trip to Beijjing every time one comes up, just to buy suits.  I took a trip to Italy a few years ago and bought a bunch of ties.  Should have looked at shoes while I was there. 

I bought about 40 Zegna and Armania ties in China also. 1 dollar apiece. Fakes? Yes. But who cares....
Jan 23, 2008 7:37 pm
Philo Kvetch:

You can have Hart Shaffner and Marx custom make a suit for around $800 that fits like, well, it was made for you.

I’m reminded that Ronald Reagan said that he wouldn’t enter the Oval Office in anything but a suit and tie…he had too much respect for the office to do otherwise. I have too much respect for the trust that clients have placed in me to meet them in anything other than a suit and tie.

    I think it depends where you are located!   When I moved my practice to Colorado I stopped wearing suits. On Friday mornings I meet clients in ski pants and a sweater.    Even the American funds rep does not wear a suit here. He had to explain this to upper management but they understood.
Jan 23, 2008 9:10 pm

I agree with Philo to an extent.  I don’t ever want to be in the office in jeans.  Unless it’s a Saturday.  I certainly don’t want to meet a new client for the first time in anything less than shirt and tie.  If I think it’s a big new client, then I want that perfect suit that was the basis of this post originally.  Now, if I lived in Florida or evidently Colorado, maybe I’d feel different.   

  noggin - if you're buying Armania ties in China, they are definitely fakes.
Jan 23, 2008 10:36 pm

[quote=Spaceman Spiff] 

noggin - if you're buying Armania ties in China, they are definitely fakes. [/quote]

Was it the spelling that convinced you, space, or the $1 price tag? 
Jan 23, 2008 11:03 pm

How do YOU differentiate fake from real…I’m not talking abt the price tag…I mean once its on. How can u tell?

Jan 24, 2008 2:57 am

[quote=Morphius] [quote=Spaceman Spiff] 

noggin - if you're buying Armania ties in China, they are definitely fakes. [/quote]

Was it the spelling that convinced you, space, or the $1 price tag? 
[/quote] OOPS, sorry about the misspell. Actually if you look at the imprint you can tell. From what I understand the ones that I purchased have the AE imprinted which is indicative of a fake. Those Chinese you gotta watch them close. So the Rolex I bought for 3 bucks is a fake too???
Jan 24, 2008 3:02 pm

Thatgirl: Guys can tell a good fake!

  Now for the suits--like I said I live in a small farming community--if I showed up in the barn with a suit on, the farmers will not talk to you--show up in a pair of slacks and a shirt without a tie--they will talk all day.   They come into the office when it rains or snows--otherwise it is too busy so you have to go out to them...I have met with farmers after milking their cows at 11:00 PM or before feeding at 5:00 AM...if you want to do business with all of them--just show up to the farm on a Saturday or Sunday and join in helping milk.  Bring them a cold soft drink out to the tractor in the spring or summer...your not going to do that in a suit...but I do where one 4 days a week at the office.  Remember 99% of your clients would not be impressed that you paid that much for a suit.  But 99% would think you make to much on their investments!
Jan 24, 2008 3:04 pm

Correction: the word is wear not where--I should use spellcheck

Jan 24, 2008 4:12 pm

Roadhard, Great post. I am fairly new to this board and still in study, but I greatly appreciate the detailed post in reference to prospecting as well as proper attire.

Thanks, DC
Jan 24, 2008 11:51 pm

[quote=Roadhard] Thatgirl: Guys can tell a good fake!



Now for the suits–like I said I live in a small farming community–if I showed up in the barn with a suit on, the farmers will not talk to you–show up in a pair of slacks and a shirt without a tie–they will talk all day.



They come into the office when it rains or snows–otherwise it is too busy so you have to go out to them…I have met with farmers after milking their cows at 11:00 PM or before feeding at 5:00 AM…if you want to do business with all of them–just show up to the farm on a Saturday or Sunday and join in helping milk. Bring them a cold soft drink out to the tractor in the spring or summer…your not going to do that in a suit…but I do where one 4 days a week at the office. Remember 99% of your clients would not be impressed that you paid that much for a suit. But 99% would think you make to much on their investments![/quote]



I respectfully disagree Roadhard. We humans are a funny breed…we like our doctors to look poor, but want our lawyers and brokers to look rich. Go figure.



As to how to tell the fakes from the real deal, that’s easy; be accustomed to the real deal and you can spot a fake a mile away. Just like everything else in life.
Jan 25, 2008 5:59 pm

It really does depend where you do business–If I was in the burbs around Chicago I would expect a good suit–if I was in a 8,000 size farming community in Iowa I would be happy to see a professional looking office with the FA in a nice shirt and tie.  Now in my farming commuity I look like the attorneys and doctors.  None wear expensive suits or drive expensive cars.  I can say without a doubt I know 85% of the people who live and work here.  Just like marketing–everybody’s plan is based on what works for them. 

   
Jan 25, 2008 6:34 pm

But your statement was,  “Remember 99% of your clients would not be impressed that you paid that much for a suit.”

  That was the claim of yours to which I take exception.
Jan 25, 2008 8:31 pm

Maybe I'm not understanding your position--99% of my clients would not appreciate it if I was spending that much on a suit.  I shouldn't judge how your clients would feel about you doing that because I'm not your client and I'm not you! 

Jan 25, 2008 10:53 pm

I think you are missing my point, Roadhard. The statement you made was not about your clients…it was about client of others besides you. What you should have said is, “99% of my clients…”.

Jan 28, 2008 2:42 pm

My bad, I should have said my clients–it was bad post

Jan 28, 2008 3:59 pm

[quote=Roadhard]It really does depend where you do business–If I was in the burbs around Chicago I would expect a good suit–if I was in a 8,000 size farming community in Iowa I would be happy to see a professional looking office with the FA in a nice shirt and tie.  Now in my farming commuity I look like the attorneys and doctors.  None wear expensive suits or drive expensive cars.  I can say without a doubt I know 85% of the people who live and work here.  Just like marketing–everybody’s plan is based on what works for them. 

   [/quote]   The funny thing is that they wouldn't look at you strange if you pulled up to their house in your $50,000 Ford F150 King Ranch edition pickup truck, wearing $95 Bill's Khakis, $50 Polo shirt, $200 loafers, and carrying your $500 leather briefcase.  But if you pulled up in your $25,000 BMW, wearing your $199 JC Penny suit, $50 shoes, carrying your vendor supplied free briefcase they'd more than likely throw you off the property for being too pretentious.    I say, do what makes you feel good.  You'll attract good clients that want to work with you.  If they don't want to work with you because of the car you drive or the suit you wear, they're not going to be happy with the service or investments you provide.   
Jan 28, 2008 7:57 pm

Well put Spiff!

Feb 8, 2008 7:13 pm

Two minor things that I think often get overlooked that make a big impression…socks and pens.  It may sound silly but I think it looks even sillier when you see someone in a nice suit, expensive shoes, a good briefcase, and then as soon as they cross their legs you see cheap looking socks.  Ditto on the pen, why go through all the effort and money to look good and then when sit down with a client you pull out a cheap bic pen. 

  Maybe I'm putting too much though into it, and maybe most clients don't care.
Feb 11, 2008 3:44 pm

I agree with the pens.  I  have a small, but growing, collection of pens.  If  you folks want to own a nice pen, specifically to sit on your desk for signing all those big deals, check out www.fountainpenhospital.com.  Order their catalog.  It's terriffic.  If you like nice things, but the nicest pen you've ever owned was a Mont Blanc, then you'll love this sight.  Some guys like watches, I like pens. 

Feb 11, 2008 11:08 pm
Spaceman Spiff:

I agree with the pens. I have a small, but growing, collection of pens. If you folks want to own a nice pen, specifically to sit on your desk for signing all those big deals, check out www.fountainpenhospital.com. Order their catalog. It’s terriffic. If you like nice things, but the nicest pen you’ve ever owned was a Mont Blanc, then you’ll love this sight. Some guys like watches, I like pens.



Couldn't agree more, Spiff. I have a couple of Waterman fountain pens that I've had for years. Clients, I think, like that little touch of elegance when doing business. I also serve coffee and tea in bone china   Again, it's the little touches that can make the difference from the client perspective.