The Sentimental Auction

From the grandfather clock that stood sentinel in the front hall of the family home to the worn-out tennis racquet Dad always used when letting his kids win a match, many estates include objects that have little or no financial value but are highly prized by the heirs. Yet most wills simply state: I give my tangible personal property equally to my children. That's because estate planning can be uncomfortable

From the grandfather clock that stood sentinel in the front hall of the family home to the worn-out tennis racquet Dad always used when letting his kids win a match, many estates include objects that have little or no financial value — but are highly prized by the heirs.

Yet most wills simply state: “I give my tangible personal property equally to my children.” That's because estate planning can be uncomfortable for some clients, and “parents sometimes fear that discussing the divisio

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