Tech Boost Productivity?

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Aug 2, 2006 4:46 pm

I'm very new to this industry, so I wanted to ask what thoughts anyone had on technology that can help boost productivity?

Currently, I have a laptop and am shopping around for a  separate computer screen to attach. I read an article in the NYTimes  Tech section some time ago which said that dramatically increasing your screen space (e.g. having two  monitors side by side or one very large screen) could boost your productivity by as much as 33 percent. This was especially true for people creating reports, having to flip back and forth between applications to gather data, working on presentations, etc. Personally, I can't bear to work for extended periods of time on my 15" laptop, but is the "two-screen option" the way to go?

Also, I'm told that I should consider recording client conversations, and again, I read in the NYTimes tech section about the latest upgrade to a voice recognition program. Apparently, there's no voice training required, and the program has some incredibly high (I think, 98 percent) accuracy. I would find the program helpful in place of a voice recorder because it eliminates the transcription time. I can't remember the program's name, but has anyone used voice recognition programs with any success?

Much thanks!

Aug 2, 2006 10:03 pm

David, in all honesty the only technology you can't do without when starting is a pencil, a notepad and a phone.


Please, for your own sake, don't overcomplicate what for you at your stage is a very simple task...get out and meet people!

Aug 3, 2006 6:07 am

SO TRUE.  MANY THANKS. I agree with the spirit of that comment...

Separate Issue:

Otherwise, what do y'all think about NOT USING your company's proprietary products? Still very new to the industry, so I'm wondering, is that a "No-No," or a "No-No-You're-Fired."  Ideally (I'm thinking), I'm going to fill my client's portfolio with better performing products... what if that doesn't include your company's mutual fund(s)? This is a very generalized question.

Aug 3, 2006 7:58 am
DavidV81:

SO TRUE.  MANY THANKS. I agree with the spirit of that comment...

Separate Issue:

Otherwise, what do y'all think about NOT USING your company's proprietary products? Still very new to the industry, so I'm wondering, is that a "No-No," or a "No-No-You're-Fired."  Ideally (I'm thinking), I'm going to fill my client's portfolio with better performing products... what if that doesn't include your company's mutual fund(s)? This is a very generalized question.


Sell NOTHING that does not go through the client's account.


If you're around long enough you'll be approached by people wanting you to introduce them to your clients so that they can sell them something--say units in an oil and gas partnership.  In return for the introduction you'll be paid a "finder's fee."


That is the surest way to the door as there is.


Often you'll feel "pressure" to sell proprietary products in the sense that your manager will "suggest" that they are what  you should be working on.  It is true that you will often be paid more if you sell them instead of something else--but you won't be fired if you're selling other things.


The deal is to sell something.

Aug 20, 2006 8:18 pm
NASD Newbie:
DavidV81:

SO TRUE.  MANY THANKS. I agree with the spirit of that comment...

Separate Issue:

Otherwise, what do y'all think about NOT USING your company's proprietary products? Still very new to the industry, so I'm wondering, is that a "No-No," or a "No-No-You're-Fired."  Ideally (I'm thinking), I'm going to fill my client's portfolio with better performing products... what if that doesn't include your company's mutual fund(s)? This is a very generalized question.


Sell NOTHING that does not go through the client's account.


If you're around long enough you'll be approached by people wanting you to introduce them to your clients so that they can sell them something--say units in an oil and gas partnership.  In return for the introduction you'll be paid a "finder's fee."


That is the surest way to the door as there is.


Often you'll feel "pressure" to sell proprietary products in the sense that your manager will "suggest" that they are what  you should be working on.  It is true that you will often be paid more if you sell them instead of something else--but you won't be fired if you're selling other things.


The deal is to sell something.



It's been said before ....ej reps have a problem with reading comprehension