What to expect at MetLife?

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Jun 28, 2009 6:29 pm

I applied for an FA position at Met, had the first phone interview already. I would like to get an idea of what to expect there. Not what the interviewer says.

 
I've lurked on this site for a long time and have been able to get a lot of answers and am avoiding a lot of pitfalls in my search for a position.
 
Thanks!
Jun 28, 2009 7:48 pm
iceco1d:

Search Button FTW!

 
Did that before I posted the question. I didn't find a lot about it.
 
I should have been more specific.
 
Are FA's just glorified Insurance Salesman with S7's? Are you pushing a lot of Propietary Product? I want to build a book that can leave with me.
Jun 28, 2009 9:42 pm

You will be expected to do mainly insurance products initially. They probably won't even recommend that you take the 7 intially, in favor of the 6 and 63. Everyone I know who started at Met did this. You will get your licenses on your own, whatever they are, then start on a four month probationary period before you're on contract, or some other term. You'll get the equivilant of about 40k annualized during the 4-month period while your production is "banked" to be paid out later. You will likely have other producers in the office trying to get you to bring in your natural market for their benefit. You will be exposed largely but not exclusively to proprietary products. The fees (E&O + tech/desk fee) are pretty high as well, I think about $300. I may be confusing certain issues between a New England Financial branch and a Metlife branch, both of which I met with, although they're almost the same with minor variants. If you're looking to get the 7, build a transferable book, and have a diverse product line, this might not be the best option. If you want to make quick rips as an insurance guy with a decent brand, it might be. Since a lot of your production will not be paid in lump sum payments but annualized, Met is a particularly unsuitable environment to join with the intention of building an easily portable book. Check the wires perhaps, if you can get on at one now...

Jun 29, 2009 9:08 am
xbanker:

You will be expected to do mainly insurance products initially. They probably won't even recommend that you take the 7 intially, in favor of the 6 and 63. Everyone I know who started at Met did this. You will get your licenses on your own, whatever they are, then start on a four month probationary period before you're on contract, or some other term. You'll get the equivilant of about 40k annualized during the 4-month period while your production is "banked" to be paid out later. You will likely have other producers in the office trying to get you to bring in your natural market for their benefit. You will be exposed largely but not exclusively to proprietary products. The fees (E&O + tech/desk fee) are pretty high as well, I think about $300. I may be confusing certain issues between a New England Financial branch and a Metlife branch, both of which I met with, although they're almost the same with minor variants. If you're looking to get the 7, build a transferable book, and have a diverse product line, this might not be the best option. If you want to make quick rips as an insurance guy with a decent brand, it might be. Since a lot of your production will not be paid in lump sum payments but annualized, Met is a particularly unsuitable environment to join with the intention of building an easily portable book. Check the wires perhaps, if you can get on at one now...



How are clients gathered at Met not transferable?  The investment clients can be moved to a new B/D as easily as any other company, and I'd assume you could maintain an insurance contract with Met to continue to rep their products and keep the renewals so long as you do a minimum level of production if you left to go independent someday down the road.  Correct me if I'm wrong.

Jun 29, 2009 9:35 am
xbanker:

You will be expected to do mainly insurance products initially. They probably won't even recommend that you take the 7 intially, in favor of the 6 and 63. Everyone I know who started at Met did this. You will get your licenses on your own, whatever they are, then start on a four month probationary period before you're on contract, or some other term. You'll get the equivilant of about 40k annualized during the 4-month period while your production is "banked" to be paid out later. You will likely have other producers in the office trying to get you to bring in your natural market for their benefit. You will be exposed largely but not exclusively to proprietary products. The fees (E&O + tech/desk fee) are pretty high as well, I think about $300. I may be confusing certain issues between a New England Financial branch and a Metlife branch, both of which I met with, although they're almost the same with minor variants. If you're looking to get the 7, build a transferable book, and have a diverse product line, this might not be the best option. If you want to make quick rips as an insurance guy with a decent brand, it might be. Since a lot of your production will not be paid in lump sum payments but annualized, Met is a particularly unsuitable environment to join with the intention of building an easily portable book. Check the wires perhaps, if you can get on at one now...

 
Thanks for the response! I've been told that 6/63 is necessary, but they will sponsor for the 7. Met said the 66 is overkill..
I am applying & talking to wires, etc. but there's not a massive demand for trainees.
Jun 29, 2009 9:41 am

They said that the 66 is overkill because they don't expect/want you to do fee based business. 

Jun 30, 2009 10:18 am

you will not be able to keep the insurance products and receive renewals unless your manager signs off and agrees to let the commissions leave his/her hands and go directly to you should you leave.  this will not happen.  if you take a career contract your insurance business will be captive.