UBS Assessment Test

or Register to post new content in the forum

12 RepliesJump to last post

 

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Jun 27, 2006 12:58 pm

I have been in the Insuance business for almost 10 years & am talking to UBS for a vacant financial advisor position. I am to take their tests next week after the holiday. The local office manager advised me of a few things, but added that some people had failed it, therefore your talks w/ them are over. What do I need to do to or look for, to pass?

Jun 28, 2006 3:59 pm

All of my clients use similar tests.  You will probably be asked to take a personality test.  Also, depending on the firm and your level of experience, you may be asked to take a math test.

As far as the personality tests go, my advice is to answer the question truthfully as written without too much analysis.

The people I have seen get in trouble with this test often tried to over-analyze the questions.  They try to figure out what the tester WANTS to hear, rather than answering truthfully.

Don't try to reverse-engineer the personality test.  Just relax and be yourself!

Jun 28, 2006 6:00 pm

The test will have some math, probability & statistics, etc. This is not a test developed by UBS, I think its from the Securities Industry to see if you have the ability to pass the Series 7.

Jun 28, 2006 8:49 pm

If it is called the assessment, it will also involve a simulated work day of an FA, including calling prospects, making a presentation, answering calls from clients and email messages, etc.

Jul 6, 2006 4:52 pm

The UBS test is different than some others because you are not allowed the use of a calculator, which is pretty senseless since this test is used to guage one's aptitude to pass the Series 7, a test where a calculator is provided for you.


Math questions are not too difficult, but can be nerve wracking when you are doing long division using pencil and paper.

Jul 6, 2006 6:02 pm
opie:

The UBS test is different than some others because you are not allowed the use of a calculator, which is pretty senseless since this test is used to guage one's aptitude to pass the Series 7, a test where a calculator is provided for you.


Math questions are not too difficult, but can be nerve wracking when you are doing long division using pencil and paper.



do you think that people who type in all lower cases and create run on sentences could do long division on paper

Jul 6, 2006 7:20 pm
NASD Newbie:
opie:

The UBS test is different than some others because you are not allowed the use of a calculator, which is pretty senseless since this test is used to guage one's aptitude to pass the Series 7, a test where a calculator is provided for you.


Math questions are not too difficult, but can be nerve wracking when you are doing long division using pencil and paper.



do you think that people who type in all lower cases and create run on sentences could do long division on paper



Nope.

Jul 6, 2006 10:30 pm
NASD Newbie:
opie:

The UBS test is different than some others because you are not allowed the use of a calculator, which is pretty senseless since this test is used to guage one's aptitude to pass the Series 7, a test where a calculator is provided for you.


Math questions are not too difficult, but can be nerve wracking when you are doing long division using pencil and paper.



do you think that people who type in all lower cases and create run on sentences could do long division on paper



Depends - they could be autistic.


Anyway, to benefit those taking a test like this later - consider this type of question:


Bob owns 200 shares of stock A, which he purchased at $25.00 and sold for $27.00.  Larry owns 300 shares of stock B, which he purchased at $30.00 and sold at $34.50.  By what percentage is Larry's rate of return greater than Bob's?


Simple question, right?  Well, when you are doing this manually, you may accidentally start wasting time by mutiplying shares owned versus purchase price for each, finding the difference, and so forth. 


But the quicker way is just to find the % difference in price for each stock (.08 and .15, respectively) and you get 7% - the amount of shares is irrevelant, but screws your time up if doing it manually.

Feb 9, 2007 3:36 am

I really don't know how to do this one? Can you guys help?

1. Mrs Smith has a portfolio valued at 400,000. 33% of her

money is in ABC stock which she purchased 4 years ago at 22 1/8 per share. Another 33% of her money is in XYZ stock

she purchased 10 years ago at 78 1/16 per share. The final 33% of her money is in WWW stock she bought 3 years ago

for 100 per share. If Mrs. Smith had sold ABC stock for a 30% increase two years ago and then purchased xyx stock

which had incrased 1/8% five years ago, what is the amout of her portfoloio. By the way, Mrs. Smith is blind and uses a

wheelchair to get around. Her favorite TV show is Golden Girls. When did her son get back from the Vietnam war? A:

True B: False C: 500,000 D: 1,000,000 E: I have no idea

2. Sally wears red. Red folks are blind. Is Sally bling...

I got this question from some other forum, I think the answer to this is Sally is blind too. am i correct?

3. The Union workers were told that

they would receive a 10% bonus IF ABC company had an increase of sales that year. All Union workers who are capable

of receiving a bonus took the speical employee training class two years ago. Company ABC had a profitable year.

George is a union worker, received a bonus, but never took the spcial class. A: True B: Kind of true C: Not enough info D:

Kind of False E: False

I think the answer to this is E. False

Feb 9, 2007 9:01 am
Spikie:

If it is called the assessment, it will also involve a simulated work day of an FA, including calling prospects, making a presentation, answering calls from clients and email messages, etc.


This is not the test you will be taking. The test you will take is to see whether you are likely to pass the series 7. The test is split into two sections. The first section is made up of analytical thinking questions, which can be slightly tricky. The second section is all math. The entire test consists of 56 questions, 30 of which you need to answer correct to pass. However if you fail but are very close to that 30 number they will let you take it again. I used the calculator that is on the desktop under the accessories tab. I started the math section without it but soon realized that I would need to use it to finish on time. They made no mention about a calculator and I wasn't about to ask. I passed with a 39 on the first try however without the calculator I would have failed. After the test they will likely schedule another interview where they will ask you to complete a business plan. I have a copy of the template if you want it. It may look very good if you show up to that interview with a plan already completed. PM if you want it.

Feb 9, 2007 8:01 pm

BASTARD!!! I can't believe you used a calculator!!! Oh well. See you in Weehawken in June

Oct 25, 2008 11:54 pm

I'm confused - is this test supposed to test industry knowledge or ability to do calculation/reading?



I have an SIA exam coming up in a few days. Any help will be greatly appreciated! Thanks so much