Student interested in the Wealth Management Industry

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Aug 6, 2013 9:45 am

I am currently a freshman at a small non target university in Georgia. My interested in finance was sparked my junior year of high school. I began reading everything I could on the markets and the careers in the industry My original career goal was investment banking, but due to my lack of motivation in my early years of high school, I was unable to get into a top university, making this goal difficult to say the least. I plan on transfering to the University of Georgia which has a better name, but us still not considered a target school. I became interested in wealth management as it seems as though it is easier to break in coming from a non target school. I understand that most financial advisors transition into the position from other fields after attaining work experience and contacts. What is your advise for a student looking to get into wealth management straight iut of college? I understand that some bigger private wealth management firms work in teams that include analyst roles? Is it feasible to get into one of these roles coming from a non target school? What are some of the main differences between private wealth management and regional financial advising?

Aug 11, 2013 10:00 pm

An analyst program at a large firm is definitely the best way to get into the industry right out of college. The programs resemble those in investment banking, but you work with wealthy clients opposed to corporations. Goldman Sachs and J.P. Morgan are the two best to strive for. I would suggest assuming you don't have a huge desire to relocate to New York, striving to land an analyst role at one of those firms' Atlanta office. Its competitve, so you need a 3.5 GPA and some marketable internships. One to consider would be Northwestern Mutual or something else in wealth management. I know that J.P. Morgan Securities--the wirehouse version of J.P. Morgan's private bank has summer interns. Get this on a resume and you'll have a good chance to get in with one of the above mentioned firms as an analyst.