Sponsorship Questions

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Feb 3, 2007 3:13 am

Guys how are you. I am a newbie just out of college. I have been sponsored for my series 7 and the 66 by this firm which on this forum isnt certainly one of the favorites. I actually agree about how horrible they are. I wont disclose the name.  My situation is that I have passed the Series 7 but havnt taken the 66 (65+63) yet.  I have scheduled the 66.  If i leave the company can i still take the exam, since I have paid them for it.  Once I pass the exam, is there any possible way they can put any obligation on me to stay with the company since they sponsored me?

Please elaborate, would really appreciate some opinions. I would call the NASD but they wont be open till monday.

Feb 3, 2007 1:38 pm

First of all- that is an asinine screen name!!  Have some GD standards..


 <?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

What firm do you work for?    
Feb 3, 2007 2:46 pm

Sure Crackhead I'll sponsor you. Go to www.youmustbeamoron.com

Feb 3, 2007 4:20 pm

First of all, to take the exam and for it to count, you must be sponsored. Is there a possibility that you won't get back the money you paid to take the exam, if you leave prior to taking the exam? Yes.


Are you obligated to stay, after taking the exam and passing? Depends on if you signed anything agreeing to stay and work for a certain period of time. As of now and based on what you've said so far, I can't see this company holding you financially liable, since you've already covered their exam-related expenses.


However, if you're unsure, consult an attorney. 

Feb 3, 2007 4:27 pm

If you take the Series 65, you don't need the 66 and 63.



Who's telling you this stuff anyway?

Feb 3, 2007 11:49 pm

I apologize for the wierd display name, its from back in highschool so easy to remember.  I think I said the 66 is equal to the completion of the 65 and 63 not the other way around.  I appreciate your responses.  I am still in a dilemma whether I want to stay in the industry.  Is there any value to the my series 7 license ( which I passed) as far as research goes.  For instance an entry level equity or Fixed Income analyst? I do not wish to disclose the firm because I think thats unethical.  But it been mentioned in many of these posts by many members that it is a big "no no" when considering a career.  Again I appreciate your replies and apologize for the foul display name, I will try to change it before I ask another question.


Feb 4, 2007 12:50 am

Man if you are right out of college explore the real world then go back to the financial sector when you are closer to 30.



This is not saying one can not make it at 18-90, but it is hard with a mindset relating to some highschool quote and inexperience in life. Good luck!

Feb 4, 2007 3:21 am
crack4free:

I apologize for the wierd display name, its from back in highschool so easy to remember.





It's a stupid name, go register again with a new name.



No one will trust you with money if your name is "crack4free"



I am still in a
dilemma whether I want to stay in the industry.  Is there any value to
the my series 7 license ( which I passed) as far as research goes.  For
instance an entry level equity or Fixed Income analyst?





No, none at all. People with a
Ser 7 sell securities. If you want to research them professionally,
then you need an academic background in finance and/or a CFA/CPA
charter.



I do not wish
to disclose the firm because I think thats unethical.  But it been
mentioned in many of these posts by many members that it is a big "no
no" when considering a career.





So which one is it? I really hope its not Primerica. If it is
primerica, tell people you worked for  McDonald's,  its more
prestegious.

Feb 4, 2007 11:47 am

Trust me on this: if you can't decide whether you want to stay in this business, don't stay in this business. To be successful, this line of work requires a dedication that goes beyond the mere "making of money". Why do I say this? Because, most likely, in the beginning of this career, you won't be making any money and the only thing that will sustain you and drive you to keep going is the love of the work.


Feb 4, 2007 2:43 pm

This statement is bulls**t…..


 <?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />


Where do you work?


Feb 4, 2007 4:48 pm
crack4free:

I apologize for the wierd display name, its from back in highschool so easy to remember.  I think I said the 66 is equal to the completion of the 65 and 63 not the other way around.  I appreciate your responses.  I am still in a dilemma whether I want to stay in the industry.  Is there any value to the my series 7 license ( which I passed) as far as research goes.  For instance an entry level equity or Fixed Income analyst? I do not wish to disclose the firm because I think thats unethical.  But it been mentioned in many of these posts by many members that it is a big "no no" when considering a career.  Again I appreciate your replies and apologize for the foul display name, I will try to change it before I ask another question.




Unethical?  Or are you just embarassed to tell people that you work for World Financial Group?