MBA focused on CFA

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Sep 23, 2009 1:38 pm

1st time posting, long time reading -- by the way, you guys are hilarious..



Does anyone know of some of the better online MBA programs that 'prepare you' for the CFA designations? I talked to Creighton University, and their program seemed good- but I'd at least like to see what my options are... any thoughts or experiences?



thanks

Sep 23, 2009 1:46 pm

Online education is for the most part a joke. Unless it is the online extension of an established terrestrial university.



Also, this is not an analysts' forum. Just an FYI before the hammer drops.

Sep 23, 2009 1:48 pm

appreciate it ... yes I know it isnt the greatest option, but none the less, its option -- and if my employer is paying, I'm receiving --

Sep 23, 2009 2:32 pm

You better watch what you are receiving......before you know it you wake up and wonder why something hurts.....

Sep 23, 2009 2:35 pm

lol .. awesome ..



the school is one of the 'partners' of the CFA institute- so at least I know theyre legit, but knocking out both at minimal cost and efficency on time seems to make sense ...

Sep 23, 2009 3:41 pm
cfawannabee:

1st time posting, long time reading -- by the way, you guys are hilarious..


Does anyone know of some of the better online MBA programs that 'prepare you' for the CFA designations? I talked to Creighton University, and their program seemed good- but I'd at least like to see what my options are... any thoughts or experiences?

thanks



If you want to earn a CFA, don't waste your time with an online MBA.
The greatest benefit of an MBA program is the professional network you build if you ever want to look for another job. This is probably why your employer wants you to do it online...

Sep 23, 2009 6:13 pm

An MBA to prepare for the CFP? Somebody is actually going to pay for it under that pretense? I don't believe it ... If I'm wrong you should stay for sure. That moron will soon get the boot and if you brown nose enough maybe you can get his job. Providing it's a job worth having. 

Sep 23, 2009 7:44 pm
Gaddock:

An MBA to prepare for the CFP? Somebody is actually going to pay for it under that pretense? I don't believe it ... If I'm wrong you should stay for sure. That moron will soon get the boot and if you brown nose enough maybe you can get his job. Providing it's a job worth having. 



It was to prepare for the CFA!!!

Sep 23, 2009 8:07 pm

My mistake.

Sep 23, 2009 10:30 pm

I think I saw an online mba advertised on registered rep that focuses on the CFP.

From what I understand, the CFA is much, much harder than an MBA.
Plus, you can do an MBA in 19 months...CFA could easily take 5 years!

Sep 24, 2009 8:38 am

the program I'm looking at is at Creighton University -



http://www.creighton-online.com/programs/online-master-of-security-analysis-and-portfolio-management-course-descriptions.asp



and here is the full list of partnering MBA programs whos curriculum is based on the CFA designation ... pretty cool

http://www.cfainstitute.org/cfaprog/university/northamerica.html

Sep 24, 2009 8:43 am

An MBA won't do jack-squat for preparing you for the CFA. If that is your primary reason for getting the MBA, you are wasting your time and money.


If anything you would be better off getting a certificate in Accounting. I tried the CFA once upon a time (level I) but I only made it through 4 sessions of the prep class. In all honesty, I was just too accounting-stupid to do it.

 
The one thing I remember about it, however, is how intense the analytical Accounting is. You really have to know how to interpret, not just understand, Financials - i.e., reading between the lines to find out what's really going on in there.
 
So, unless your MBA is going to have an acounting focus, I really don't see the point.
 
Sep 24, 2009 8:47 am

As someone who has taken all three levels of the CFA exams, and who has an MBA, I'll echo the fact that it doesn't help. I concentrated in finance.



However, the programs at the partner universities generally have some direction.



I believe Creighton also has a Masters in Securities Analysis? That would be your best bet. The curriculums are similar.

Sep 24, 2009 8:48 am

Cape1, and everyone else for that matter - take a look at the Creighton Program I posted -- looks like its saying exactly that -- giving you the fundamentals on the CFA



Or is it a sales pitch? I've been around the block a couple of times to really think this is actually going to be more beneficial rather than a waste of time --



To make it ez, I'll just post the program and feel free to share thoughts:





Master of Security Analysis and Portfolio Management (MSAPM) Course Descriptions

MSA 720 Ethics & Professional Standards (3 credits)

An intensive study of the CFA Institute Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct, the Global Investment Performance Standards (GIPS®), corporate governance issues and risks affecting companies.



MSA 722 Fixed Income and Derivatives I (3 credits) A study of fixed income investments, including basic characteristics of bonds in alternative sectors, valuation tools, and factors that influence bond yields. Also includes a study of derivative investments, including forwards, futures, options, and swaps.



MSA 724 Quantitative Analysis (3 credits) A study of elementary statistics, data collection and analysis, regression and correlation analysis, probability theory and distributions, hypothesis testing, and the time value of money. Also covers regression and correlation analysis and time series analysis as they are used in portfolio management.



MSA 726 International Trade, Alternative Investments and Portfolio Management (3 credits - Elective) A study of alternative investments, including mutual funds, exchange traded funds, real estate, venture capital, hedge funds, closely held companies, distressed securities, and commodities and commodity derivatives. A study of international trade, including foreign exchange and parity conditions. Also a study of the elements of the portfolio management process, including the investment setting, investment policy, and asset allocation.



MSA 728 Corporate Finance (3 credits - Elective) A study of capital budgeting concepts and analysis, capital structure issues, cost of capital, dividend policy considerations, and the market for corporate control. Discusses how corporate finance concepts, such as cash flow, liquidity, leverage, cost of capital, and dividends, are used in the valuation process.



MSA 730 Financial Statement Analysis I (3 credits) A study of financial accounting procedures and the rules that govern disclosure. Emphasis is placed on basic financial statements and how alternative accounting methods affect those statements, the analysis of financial statement relationships, and the implications of alternative accounting methods for financial analysis and valuation.



MSA 732 Capital Markets (3 credits) A study of macroeconomic and microeconomic principles, including the key components of economic activity, macroeconomic theory and policy. Also a study of equity investments, including securities markets, effcient market theory, the analysis of equity risk and return (for industries and companies), and technical analysis.



MSA 734 Equity Analysis (3 credits) A study of the concepts and techniques that are basic to the valuation of equity securities.



MSA 736 Fixed Income and Derivatives II (3 credits) A study of methods to estimate risk and returns for fixed income instruments, analyze fixed income instruments with unique features, and value fixed income instruments with embedded options. Discusses the valuation of futures, forwards, options, and swaps. MSA 722 is a prerequisite for this course.



MSA 738 Financial Statement Analysis II (3 credits) Presents the analysis and use financial statements and accompanying disclosures in the investment valuation process. Also discusses the differences among U.S. and international accounting standards as they relate to financial and valuation analyses.



MSA 740 Portfolio Management (3 credits) A study of methods used to estimate the return and determine the risk of various securities and a study of the basic principles of the portfolio management process to specic scenarios.



CFA Institute® does not endorse, promote, or warrant the accuracy or quality of the products or services offered by Creighton University. CFA Institute®, CFA®, and Chartered Financial Analyst® are trademarks owned by CFA Institute®. The CFA Institute® is the sole grantor of the CFA® Charter designation.

Sep 24, 2009 8:50 am

Thanks Moraen - thats what my gut is telling me too

Sep 24, 2009 9:07 am
cfawannabee:

Thanks Moraen - thats what my gut is telling me too





Also, FWIW - that program will help you with the Level I exam, and some of Level II. IMHO, the CFA is sort of a doctoral program without the dissertation, although Level III requires you to know how to write IPS's. There are Ph.D's who fail the exams.

Sep 24, 2009 9:10 am

yes, I because of the degree of difficulty I figured it would be best to get all the help I could get ...

Sep 24, 2009 9:27 am
iceco1d:

Profs in my grad program also mentioned that there are Ph.D's that fail the CFA exam.



Btw Moraen, do you really think that if you had NO background in Finance/Accounting/Economics, that an MBA concentration in Finance wouldn't help you AT ALL with the CFA? Serious question.



The Finance MBA stuff probably seemed easy and redundant to you, because you (and I) already had a background in it. What if you were a 5 year guy with EDJ, that has his undergrad in Phys. Ed. Don't you think they would benefit from such a program, before diving into the CFA?





No, you are right. An MBA would certainly help someone who doesn't have a background in finance. Especially in Economics.



But I think you would still feel like a fish out of water.