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Aug 20, 2006 7:49 pm

Im fairly new to the business, at this point I'm working, including

commute about 70 hours per week. Hitting the phones pretty hard along

with other things. I know I am at the point where I have to put my time in,

which is what I'm doing. Right now I have absolutely no life at all, and I

know it is going to be like this for a few years. When i get down on myself

I just try to think about how great life will be in a few years. I see how

some of the big producers in my office , of which their book is mostly

annuitized through fee based products, and their life seems absolutely

amazing. What I am truly asking is if any of you have any advice or

experience in what you did to deal with your first few years. Not so much

what you did to bring in business, but what you did to keep yourself from

jumping out of a window. How did you guys/ girls deal with starting out

in the business, what did you do to keep yourself from going crazy. Any

advice would be great. I know this is what I want and I'm willing to have

no life for a while but I'm starting to feel a little burned out. Thanks in

advance for your input

Aug 20, 2006 8:06 pm

This business gets easier as you get older hang in there. I always encourage rookies to start in a non-sales role until they look at least 30.

Aug 20, 2006 8:24 pm

How many face to face meetings do you have a week?  If you are not seeing at least 15 a week, you are putting in lots of hours, but definitely are not productive.


I keep saying it, but the best way to make money in the early years is to selling both protection (insurance) products and accumulation (investments) products.

Aug 20, 2006 8:25 pm

Ask people for what you want. If you want them to place an order, ask them. If you want a decision, agree upfront when they will make the decision.


Tell them the entire truth about what you're thinking/feeling. If you're nervous in a meeting, say so. If you're afraid that they will say no, tell them that. If you're uncomfortable asking them for a referral, tell them (then ask).


Tell them the truth about your products. Tell them the things that you don't like about them. These things are NOT deal breakers - they are deal makers. People already know that things aren't perfect and they just want to know what they're getting into.


Stop listening to people on this board who tell you you're too young. The truth can cancel out a lot of obstacles.

Aug 20, 2006 9:05 pm

Thanks for the input guys. Knucklehead I do agree with you completely,

especially with regards to age. As much as every one tries to say that youth

has no place in this business , I would have to disagree. The young advisors

are the future of this business. Not to sound immature but it has been tough

adjusting to the hours and the lack of social life. I am willing to give up on

the social life but its tough when all of your buddies are going out on a

Sunday night and I need to be sleeping at 10 so I can get up at 5. I know

that most of your responses are going to be to just suck it up, and maybe

thats the answer but I was wandering if and how any of you guys were able

to balance some sort of life while you started out in the business. If its not

possible I am completly willing to accept that, yet if any of you have

suggestions I would truly appreciate it.

Aug 20, 2006 9:14 pm

And we wonder why 90% fail out w/in the first 2 years?


I think you've "received" horrible advice.  If you aren't comfortable with your own reco's, leave the biz.  There ARE products you can feel totally comfortable in recommending.  This is the securities' business- it's not guaranteed.  Risk vs. reward and all that.


Suggest you search for better advice.

Aug 20, 2006 9:17 pm
keith121883:

Thanks for the input guys. Knucklehead I do agree with you completely,
especially with regards to age. As much as every one tries to say that youth
has no place in this business , I would have to disagree. The young advisors
are the future of this business. Not to sound immature but it has been tough
adjusting to the hours and the lack of social life. I am willing to give up on
the social life but its tough when all of your buddies are going out on a
Sunday night and I need to be sleeping at 10 so I can get up at 5. I know
that most of your responses are going to be to just suck it up, and maybe
thats the answer but I was wandering if and how any of you guys were able
to balance some sort of life while you started out in the business. If its not
possible I am completly willing to accept that, yet if any of you have
suggestions I would truly appreciate it.


It's gonna be really awful when you get your second Benz and your buddies are still on their first Camry.

Aug 20, 2006 9:52 pm

I agree 100 percent and thats what gets me through the days. I know itll be

worth it in the end. Sometimes you just need to vent a little bit, ya know.

Aug 20, 2006 11:24 pm
keith121883:

I agree 100 percent and thats what gets me through the days. I know itll be
worth it in the end. Sometimes you just need to vent a little bit, ya know.


If you wanna feel better, go beat up on peanutbroker a little bit. His self-esteem is running a little too high.

Aug 21, 2006 6:38 am

It is impossible to have too much self esteem.  Just like it is impossible to have too many crayons.