How many ways to get clients?

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Sep 5, 2006 12:31 pm

Hi  guys, I  have another question.  I can not seem t
o  be able to find the answer.  Besides  cold calling,
doing seminars, and  just knowing  a lot of people, 
what other methods do you use to get clients and leads?

Thanks,



Sep 5, 2006 1:40 pm

There are some good books on this topic.  I can't link to them from here, so PM me or check my web site.

There are really only three ways to meet new prospects:

1. Meet strangers one at a time.  (Cold calling, cold walking, basic networking).
2. Meet strangers in groups.  (Seminars)
3. Get introduced to strangers one at a time (professional referral relationships, client referrals, networking done right).

You're looking for magic bullets because everybody else seems to be doing seminars and networking.  You've got to realize that these techniques are used because they can work.  Just pay attention to seminar and networking techniques that work for other reps in the same target market.  Take what works and run with it, if possible adding a unique differentiator.

Disclaimer before I get flamed again: I am a recruiter passing along things I hear from candidates, past placements and hiring managers.  I've never done this, I just know a lot of people who do it well.

Hope this helps.  Good luck!


Sep 9, 2006 12:31 am

I've done cold calling, purchased leads, cold canvased..and none worked for me effectively.  It took me 1 year of making all of these mistakes. 


"Get introduced to strangers one at a time (professional referral relationships, client referrals, networking done right)." - has worked for me.  Being introduced on a favorable basis is more important than ever.  No one will part with lots of money if they do not see you in a favorable light.  Retention rate will go up, % of appointments to calls will go up, and closing ratio will go up.  A financial sales rep is a commodity.  Getting a connection that is favorable from the get go is key.


My system is simply acquire as many connections as possible through my center of influences.  Also, speaking engagements in a niche market allows me to generate names.   I invite them to something free.  Either a speaking engagement of mine or an electronic newsletter all for free.  When I call sometime later, I have a high appointment ratio.  If you come across as trust worthy in your appointment and are somewhat compentant, you'll do fine. 


Sep 9, 2006 8:49 am

Clearly seminars are the most effective way to reach people who are in the mood to buy--if they were not they wouldn't be at the seminar.


The fallacy in this idea is that you have to be a good public speaker, you have to have a very organized presentation, and you have to have credibilty.  Rookies of any age are not yet confident in their knowledge to feel comfortable in front of a group--and kids won't have credibility regardless of much knowledge they have.


Additionally seminars have to have a focus--the folks are no longer interested in attending an "investment seminar."  Hardly a day goes by that  don't get an invitation to come to a "retirement planning" seminar.  I am still wondering how my name and address got out there, although I have a strong suspicion that it the "Optionetics" people.


For years people had been asking me if I knew anything about George Fontenellis (or whatever his name is) and all I knew is that he did options seminars--so one evening I went to one down in Florida.  Normally when I do things like that I put down that I live at 4820 Elm Street in whatever town I'm in--but for some reason I put my real address on that registration form.  I thought perhaps I'd get some valuable information, after all I'd been hearing the guy's name for several years.


For what it's worth, Optionetics was formed by a guy who traded on the CBOE floor and has a "system."  They hold free informational meetings where they pitch a seminar that costs something like $3,900 but you get a $1,000 discount if you sign up that night.  The seminar is conducted on the next weekend and they have a very unusual closer.  If you cannot generate profits equal to your fee by using their system they will give you your money back.


I was born late one night, but it was not last night, so I opted to pass on the opportunity.  As I left I noticed that most of the others were leaving too--but there were two or three people who appeared ready to sign up.  If they did their registration fees would more than cover the cost of renting the meeting room which was at the Naples Ritz Carlton.  I've learned that the fancier the meeting faclity the more likely you're going to be shown a scam--the millionaire next door types are more than happy to come to a meeting at a Holiday Inn.


++++++


The other thing that most brokers fail to do is ask for referrals.  I've seen guys do it with somebody who was telling them to get off their phone--in other words they were blowing the broker off, yet the broker had the presence of mind to say (essentially) "Well, screw you too--but do you know somebody who might not be such a butthole."


Always--as in ALWAYS--ask for a referral.  What's the worst that can happen?

Sep 9, 2006 8:54 am

What is a clearly seminar?

Sep 9, 2006 9:15 am
JimmytheRocker:

I've done cold calling, purchased leads, cold canvased..and none worked for me effectively.  It took me 1 year of making all of these mistakes. 


"Get introduced to strangers one at a time (professional referral relationships, client referrals, networking done right)." - has worked for me.  Being introduced on a favorable basis is more important than ever.  No one will part with lots of money if they do not see you in a favorable light.  Retention rate will go up, % of appointments to calls will go up, and closing ratio will go up.  A financial sales rep is a commodity.  Getting a connection that is favorable from the get go is key.


My system is simply acquire as many connections as possible through my center of influences.  Also, speaking engagements in a niche market allows me to generate names.   I invite them to something free.  Either a speaking engagement of mine or an electronic newsletter all for free.  When I call sometime later, I have a high appointment ratio.  If you come across as trust worthy in your appointment and are somewhat compentant, you'll do fine. 



Care must be given to not offer newsletters written by you if you're functionally illiterate.


Software to check spelling will not catch "advise" and "advice" or "you're" and "your" or "by" and "buy," and so forth.


If you know you're not very good with the language, besides being ashamed you should be very careful about doing your own newsletter.


Good advice presented badly is not a positive for your image.

Sep 9, 2006 1:38 pm

"Always--as in ALWAYS--ask for a referral.  What's the worst that can happen?"


Exactly.... Whats the worst that can happen....


Hey old man, I know you are into tennis.... Whatcha think about a Federer v. Roddick possible showdown tomorrow....

Sep 10, 2006 1:09 am
NASD Newbie:
JimmytheRocker:

I've done cold calling, purchased leads, cold canvased..and none worked for me effectively.  It took me 1 year of making all of these mistakes. 


"Get introduced to strangers one at a time (professional referral relationships, client referrals, networking done right)." - has worked for me.  Being introduced on a favorable basis is more important than ever.  No one will part with lots of money if they do not see you in a favorable light.  Retention rate will go up, % of appointments to calls will go up, and closing ratio will go up.  A financial sales rep is a commodity.  Getting a connection that is favorable from the get go is key.


My system is simply acquire as many connections as possible through my center of influences.  Also, speaking engagements in a niche market allows me to generate names.   I invite them to something free.  Either a speaking engagement of mine or an electronic newsletter all for free.  When I call sometime later, I have a high appointment ratio.  If you come across as trust worthy in your appointment and are somewhat compentant, you'll do fine. 



Care must be given to not offer newsletters written by you if you're functionally illiterate.


Software to check spelling will not catch "advise" and "advice" or "you're" and "your" or "by" and "buy," and so forth.


If you know you're not very good with the language, besides being ashamed you should be very careful about doing your own newsletter.


Good advice presented badly is not a positive for your image.




I'm very handsome in my newsletter pictures.  They love it.


hehe