General Question about Autonomy

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Jun 7, 2008 5:14 pm

As some of you already know from my previous posts, I am looking to get into the industry after a career in pharmaceutical/medical sales. One of the main reasons I am looking to get into the industry is because of the freedom and autonomy that advisors report having once they are established.



However, the more I look into the industry the more I notice that the wirehouses have similar titles to my life in medical sales. District Managers, Regional Managers, etc...



So do you all really feel that you have "your own business" and the autonomy that are selling points on all of the websites for the big firms?



For example, do you have many mandatory meetings? Do you have meetings to plan meetings? Mandatory conference calls?



I know that every advisor I have spoken with in person has said that they have the freedom to set up their schedule how they see fit. But I just thought it was funny to see so many "managers" in these companies corporate ladders.



**Disclaimer- I know that in the first few years your life is nothing but working and that you should be grateful for any direction that comes your way.

Jun 8, 2008 1:22 pm

Runner, don't get confused by all the titles. In this business you are either a producer or a manager. Once you are off the training salary and you are hitting you numbers, nobody will care what you do or how you do it. Just do what is right for the client and don't break any laws.


My branch has weekly office meetings, meetings with wholesalers, meeting with internal product specialist, practice management meetings, etc... We attend the meetings we deem worth our time.

Jun 9, 2008 8:58 am

runner, we get paid to produce.  If you produce, autonomy won't be a problem.