EDJ training

or Register to post new content in the forum

38 RepliesJump to last post

 

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Mar 5, 2008 10:44 pm

I am new here and recently applied to EDJ. I am curious what the average compensation is during the training program? I know they go over this during the interview process and it say everywhere that it is based on experience/geographical area but I was hoping to get an estimate. Thanks

Mar 5, 2008 11:11 pm

The search button is your friend.

Mar 6, 2008 6:45 am

I used the search button for over a hour and did not find anything related to the training compensation. Everything discussed is about what to expect during your first year of selling. I am looking for income information for the 10 week home study. Thanks

Mar 6, 2008 8:31 am

Depends on how much you made at your old job.. and your market. I think I was around $10.00 an hour, but they expect you to work around 10-12 hour days so they pay you time and a half.. hope that helps.. you could get more or less. I was shocked at how low it was!


 
Miss J
Mar 6, 2008 9:24 am

Hi there, I'm applying to EJ as well. My final f2f interview is actually next Thursday. When I spoke with my recruiter, she said the stipend during training is 2000-2200 per month depending on your location. The company is very up front about that, and they will also advise you to have money set aside before you start the training process with them.

If I were you, I would contact your recruiter and ask them. After all, that's what they're there for.

Mar 6, 2008 10:08 am

20,000 to 25,000 is the first year salary is what I was told by the EJ recruiter.

Mar 6, 2008 10:45 am
 
Mar 6, 2008 10:58 am

Getmethod,


I believe you are confusing "salary" and "compensation."  The average FA with Jones will make between 50-55,000 their first year, however the majority of that is generated from the commissions on your sales.  The salary is only 20,000 to 25,000 for the first year!
Mar 6, 2008 12:28 pm
 
Mar 6, 2008 12:34 pm

Depending on how much you are currently earning prior to EJ, you will probably need some savings set aside.

Mar 6, 2008 2:31 pm
getmethod:

I meant overall compensation. However...my "salary" starting off for the first 4 months of selling (after training) is high 30's. Obviously, this is not an exact representation of a full year's salary since it diminishes through the year as production should increase. I did qualify my statement with stating that what you make is based on current salary, experience, and effort. Of course, geographic location is a factor as well.

 
Point taken though...
 
Also depends on milestone bonuses.  Those can add up to a lot if you are hitting your numbers.  My first year, which was slightly above average (in terms of production), was in the mid-60's.  I was also at the top salary level (my previous income & work history, along with my region, dictated that).  And I was only selling for half the year.
 
If you don't end up making at least in the mid 50's your first two years, you are probably struggling big-time.
Mar 8, 2008 3:03 pm

24, correct me if I'm wrong, your salary is an expense that goes directly onto your P&L.  Therefore, the higher the salary the more production will be required of you.

Mar 8, 2008 7:29 pm

the salary goes down every month. it is TOTALLY irrelevant after a very few months if you have any hope of doing this. meaningless. it is all about commissions, and is very doable if you prospect a lot. If you prefer to push paper and analyze mutual funds, your pay will go way down.  I remember that my first full calendar year was 95000 or so, and I started newnew (zero accounts). Had sales experience though--huge help. Also have a "few" gray hairs. I.ve seen 20 somethings do it, though.

Mar 8, 2008 7:46 pm
newnew:

Also have a "few" gray hairs. 

 
You should baby, pamper, & appreciate those "few" gray hairs. All I have are the remnants of a once great civilization. 
 
In fact, I see an avatar in the mirror every morning.
Mar 9, 2008 9:20 am
lambda:

24, correct me if I'm wrong, your salary is an expense that goes directly onto your P&L. Therefore, the higher the salary the more production will be required of you.





Well, not sure what you're trying to ask. But yes, your salary (and net commissions) are charged against your P&L. But I'm not sure why you think a higher salary will require higher production. A P&L is just financial results for the branch. It does not affect your income until you are profitable (usually several years) and start earning profit bonuses. So early on, there is really no correlation between your salary and your production.

Not sure if I am answering the question you are asking. Let me know.

Mar 9, 2008 9:21 pm

newnew, is the $95,000 first year, $240,000. gross? That's impressive starting with 0.

Mar 9, 2008 11:20 pm

No...it is $95K gross....

Mar 10, 2008 8:47 pm

95 Gross would be average.  I grossed 175K, but payout was up due to winning a trip to Hawaii and many monthly bonuses. One month my new account bonus was 1600. People say you cannot do that starting from zero, and then they proceed to do PAPERWORK between 9am and 5pm. Big mistake.

Mar 10, 2008 8:54 pm

also was still on salary.....great deal!

Mar 11, 2008 9:25 am
newnew:

95 Gross would be average.  I grossed 175K, but payout was up due to winning a trip to Hawaii and many monthly bonuses. One month my new account bonus was 1600. People say you cannot do that starting from zero, and then they proceed to do PAPERWORK between 9am and 5pm. Big mistake.

 
Great to hear! As I begin my career with EJ, I would be very interested to learn what some of your tactics were to achieve such success. I'll be starting new new and already know that one of the keys to success is to approach this as your own business; not with an employee mentality and that 9 to 5 does not cut it.  
 
Any advice is greatly appreciated.