Are 2 days enough to study for insurance?

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Oct 5, 2006 12:45 pm

I want to take the exam on Saturday. IS today and tomorrow enough time? say 20 hrs?

Oct 5, 2006 12:46 pm

Easily.

Oct 5, 2006 12:49 pm

aight. Yhx.

Oct 5, 2006 1:07 pm

Why waste that much time?  Just go take it.  How hard can it be?

Oct 5, 2006 8:31 pm

Soon


 
Why waste that much time?  Just go take it.  How hard can it be?


<?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

This is pure unadulterated baloney.   



I would recommend at least 5 days of preparation.  These morons on this forum are full of it. 


Take the exam and post your real score after only 2 days of preparation. 
Oct 6, 2006 7:42 pm

Ditto, DirtyDeltaBro!

Oct 6, 2006 10:37 pm

Cmon now DirtyDelta, the insurance exam is a joke!

Oct 6, 2006 11:03 pm

If his/her only task was to study for the LAH, then I would say it is possible.  But I am sure this person has other things s to do at work, as opposed to pounding a book for 8 hours a day.


 <?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

There is no benefit to taking a test before you are ready.  Why would you sit for an exam without having adequately prepared?  You are setting your self up to pull an f bomb..
Oct 7, 2006 1:59 am

I studied for 2 days and passed

Oct 7, 2006 7:08 am

2 days is plenty. that's what I did.

Oct 7, 2006 11:36 am

When I took the exam 18 years ago, it was before we were required to have X number of classroom hours.  We went to a cram session from 8am to noon. Continued to cram knowledge into our heads through lunch. We walked ran right next door to take the test at 1pm and puked up the knowledge on the test before we forgot it and got fingerprinted before we walked out the door. 


Ta Dah!!! By 3pm we were all insurance agents and still didn't know doo squat.  No wonder there are so many adverse claims against the insurance industry.


I don't know what the exam is like now, but I hope it is harder.

Oct 7, 2006 3:45 pm

took yesterday off, and i rescheduled it. i want to get this right the first time and not have to bother with any more exams 'till the end of the year.


Babbling, I took the classes too but found it to be an utter waste of time and I sure as hell was not going in the exam the next day to puke out info I did not understand (which is what the instructor insisted)


Oct 7, 2006 4:30 pm

Good for you, anabuhabkuss. For me and probably for most people, taking more time to study is the wisest course to take.


When I was in college, I crammed for tests all the time. But that was because most of the dribble I was required to take and learn would mean nothing to me later in life. As long as I knew it at test time, that was all I cared about. Thirty years later, that belief has proven true.


However, with insurance, you must know it intimately for your clients benefit and for your career. So, is it important? Heck yes! My advice is to first learn all the moving parts of insurance and then (the hard part) learn how to apply them to real life situations. It's a little like being a car mechanic and knowing how to drive well.


I came across an article last week, quoting a spokeperson from the SIA (Securities Industry Association), stating that revenues at the major B/Ds will be down 25% in 2007. If that proves true, what would cause a decline of that magnitude? The number one answer is a market decline of substantial proportions. How is this relevant to a topic on insurance?


A declining market may prove to be advantageous to those FA's well-versed in insurance products. If the market is down and there's blood in the headlines, do you simply sit on your hands waiting for a correction? Or do you market some insurance products offering upside potential and peace of mind (thru principal guarantees)?


Becoming well-versed in offering products that are geared to both rising and declining markets will serve you well in your career. In fact, it means your very survival and (if you're really good) your success.


Good luck!

Oct 7, 2006 4:30 pm

 Anabuhabkuss:<?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />


 


You have made a very wise decision.  The majority of the so called brokers on this forum are bull of garbage..



The insurance exam had changed over the years.  I recently took the LAH and I can assure you it required adequate preparation. 




The material is not as quantitative as the material on the 7 and 66 exams, but by no means does that mean it can be learned the night before.



There is not one person on this board that could learn the material in one night.    



Oct 9, 2006 3:38 pm


I took the Insurance Exam last Friday.  I despised it!  Actually, the exam wasn’t all that difficult; it was the pre-licensing education requirements that drove me crazy.  In <?:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />New Jersey they require a total of 65 hours in the classroom.<?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />


 


Now I’m going through the hassle of going to get another set of fingerprints taken.  This time they need to be done by some agency which has a two-week backup in scheduling.


 


I hate insurance!


 


--WM  


Oct 9, 2006 4:45 pm

Wait 'til you start writing it and have to deal with insurance companies.


I'd rather have a root canal.

Oct 10, 2006 12:28 pm
babbling looney:

When I took the exam 18 years ago, it was before we were required to have X number of classroom hours.  I don't know what the exam is like now, but I hope it is harder.



When I took the exam 5 months agos I was also required to take 35 hours of classroom instruction ,pass the class with an 80% before being able to take the state exam.


I guess it's easier in some states

Oct 10, 2006 7:16 pm
F.B.:
babbling looney:

When I took the exam 18 years ago, it was before we were required to have X number of classroom hours.  I don't know what the exam is like now, but I hope it is harder.



When I took the exam 5 months agos I was also required to take 35 hours of classroom instruction ,pass the class with an 80% before being able to take the state exam.


I guess it's easier in some states [PERIOD]



Must have been hard to convince the zoo keeper to let you out of your cage eh?  What kind of firm would hire a chimp to be a broker? 


Have a good streak of luck when they were doing that WSJ article?