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Jul 21, 2006 7:36 am

I would like some input about my situation. I had too much fun in college and my job situation at that time was not the best. I did not participate in any activities nor did I give anything back to the academic community unless you count chasing women and drinking. I worked in Jewelery Sales, about 3 yrs (along with some other part time work), then as a Loan Officer for about 6 months, now I am a Benefits Counselor for my state retirement plan (just over 1 year). I applied with EJ (I have taken note of all the negative comments). I did not even make it to the phone interview (yes I have tried to fog up a mirror and I did).


1.If I can just get an interview, I am set, I can sell myself, should I embellish my resume for a bigger firm, just to get my foot in the door?


2.I have been offered a position with WFG, AXA and WR, I am most seriously looking at WR (I have taken note of all the negative comments about all three). If you can sell, could you not make money at any one of those firms?


3.About the "resume killer" WR, if I had a large client base taking in some serious money working for WR, would a recruiter not even consider me since I work there (I find that hard to believe).

Jul 21, 2006 8:04 am

1. no


2. yes, you could not


3. you won't bring big money into WR

Jul 21, 2006 8:18 am
cranky sob:

1. no


2. yes, you could not


3. you won't bring big money into WR



Never embellish a resume--if anything leave things off.  If you're a young kid with what you consider to be a lot of experience, it may play as being a job hopper to a real adult.


I think it's best to simply ignore college jobs that are irrelevant-or incorporate them as a catch all phrase such as "Worked off and on while in college in typical college jobs." 


What you young people must NEVER lose sight of is that people with substantial assets are not going to be willing--much less eager--to do business with representatives of firms whose names they do not know.


When you're young there is nothing--AS IN NOTHING--of more help to you than if your business card reflects a name brand.  It's instant credibility because the prospect will think, "Well, he's certainly young--but his company is well known and very professional, so I guess he is too."


That won't happen with a Waddell and Reed business card--it might with AXA, especially if you say, "We used to be called The Equitable."

Jul 21, 2006 8:31 am
NASD Newbie:
cranky sob:

1. no


2. yes, you could not


3. you won't bring big money into WR



Never embellish a resume--if anything leave things off.  If you're a young kid with what you consider to be a lot of experience, it may play as being a job hopper to a real adult.


I think it's best to simply ignore college jobs that are irrelevant-or incorporate them as a catch all phrase such as "Worked off and on while in college in typical college jobs." 


What you young people must NEVER lose sight of is that people with substantial assets are not going to be willing--much less eager--to do business with representatives of firms whose names they do not know.


When you're young there is nothing--AS IN NOTHING--of more help to you than if your business card reflects a name brand.  It's instant credibility because the prospect will think, "Well, he's certainly young--but his company is well known and very professional, so I guess he is too."


That won't happen with a Waddell and Reed business card--it might with AXA, especially if you say, "We used to be called The Equitable."


You seem bitter, Putsy. 


Did W&R turn down your application again?

Jul 21, 2006 12:06 pm

No.  You should never lie on a resume.

You probably already know that it's wrong to 'embellish' your resume.  If you don't already know that then I feel sorry for your future customers (if any).

If you need a practical reason to be truthful, then consider this.  If a firm or the NASD discovers a material misrepresentation AFTER you get your license, they will fire you instantly.  Your reasons for termination go on your NASD record, and that record will follow you everywhere.

But that's okay.  Your resume is just one tool that you can use to get a job.  There are other ways.

It seems you have decided that these firms are your "better than
nothing" choices.  Before you compromise, you should make the effort to
get in with one of the firms on your top-tier list.


If you were already Series 7 licensed I'd tell you to call me, since a good headhunter (there are several on this board) can get a manager to look beyond a candidate's paper credentials.  Managers know that if we waste their time we will soon be collecting unemployment (or worse).

The next best thing is to find out the names of the local branch managers for your first-choice firms and cold call them.

Just put together a pitch.  Keep it short.  Then smile and dial.

Don't try to sneak past any gatekeepers.  This is not a time to
ruse anybody.  Your first job is to get the branch manager's admin on your side.  The
typical branch manager's assistant is an omnipotent and omnicient force
within the office.  You won't be able to BS her since she works with
FAs every day.  Just give her the straight pitch.  If you impress her
with your salesmanship then she'll set up a call for you with the BM or
SM.

You can take it from there, right?

These guys and gals are pretty smart.  They know a closer when they hear one.

Good luck!  And let us know what happens.


Jul 21, 2006 1:48 pm

Sales experience is one thing, getting people to give you their cash is another.


This is a job for hard working, serious, people who have a passion for the field.


People do not give their money to goof offs.

Jul 21, 2006 2:08 pm
maybeeeeeeee:

People do not give their money to goof offs.



Also an excellent point.  It sounds like your 'youthful mistakes' are behind you.  If you don't have your act together, then you won't last long.

You'll probably have better luck running for political office or something.

Jul 21, 2006 3:14 pm

Well thank you for all the sound advice, especially the cold calling of the offices, I had not thought of that before. As far as my mistakes of youth, I have left them all behind, though I am far to good looking to run for political office. My wife (I am recently married) co-worker's fiance is a VP for Wachovia, I am getting his number this afternoon.


One more question, I looked today at getting a Series 7 study guide, is this a bad idea since I have not accepted a position, or is it better to be over prepared for the test?

Jul 21, 2006 3:21 pm
Start:

One more question, I looked today at getting a Series 7 study guide, is this a bad idea since I have not accepted a position, or is it better to be over prepared for the test?



Cue NASD Newbie

Jul 21, 2006 3:35 pm

You're probably better off focusing on the interviews at this point.  I suggest several books on my web site.  I think the best one to start with is The Art of Selling to the Affluent.  HNW sales is a very demanding specialty.  You may have more of a learning curve than you expected.