40 hour week

or Register to post new content in the forum

21 RepliesJump to last post

 

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Mar 6, 2007 3:25 pm

hello everyone, I just started with SB (finished my series 7 today) and I am currently working between 45-50 hours a week, more than anyone else in my small office.  I bring this up because of the recent overtime lawsuit that SB had to pay out, this has led my BM to tell to not overextent myself and to work my 40 hours.  However, I am reading between the lines and I keep hearing of all the hours that a new RR has to put in.  I have been very productive in my time, completing all of my tasks, keeping up on the markets and getting a webpage up and running.  How does this overtime ruling affect new hirees in training?  moose


This site has been helpful to me, but for all of you posters who just write absolute garbage, save your time and effort.

Mar 6, 2007 3:32 pm

"This site has been helpful to me, but for all of you posters who just write absolute garbage, save your time and effort."


We will help you, but first could you please help us. Can you put together a list of those posters whose content you find to be of value, and those whose posts belong in trash bins. If you wish (time permitting of course), you may even provide a separate column of those unique members who display both qualities...


Thank you for your time and consideration.

Mar 6, 2007 3:55 pm

I'm quite certain he/she doesn't mean to exclude you, Blarm.


Mooose: For most of training (until Warren), the expectation is that you will complete everything within the 40 hour week.  I call this period the calm before the storm, since you can't legally prospect yet (I'm sure others here will have recommendations with what else to do during this time).  Once you become exempt and get your number, knock yourself out.

Mar 6, 2007 4:01 pm

Moose,


You just passed your 7, you have to study for you 63 get your life health (get the health while you're there) put together some lists of potential vics and generally, get ready for Hartford(?).


As you may recall from your 7, you are not a broker quite just yet. You need the apprentice period during which there will be corp indoctrination and lemonade chugaluggin contests when at you will run into lots of guys who will tell you how wonderful they are and you aren't.


Keeping up on markets? Why? What do you think you are going to be? A Stockbroker? Your only job for the next number of years is going to be being an asset hunter/gatherer. You are now one of those Geico guys! Nothing wrong with being a caveman, scratching away looking for tubers under the ground, living off nuts and berries and noticing that the brokers that ate such and such a mushroom died dead! (Sorry, I just finished Guns Germs and Steel and I'm on a hunter gatherer riff)


The long hours start when you get your fc number, then they put you into the cold calling boardroom and you start trying to evolve into a farmer.

Mar 6, 2007 4:05 pm

Oh, and lose this web address. Don't come back.

Mar 6, 2007 8:49 pm

well blarm, you will top my list, as your response has absolutely no relevance, but you have been passed by whomitmayconcern, who has no life and has wasted two useless response on my topic, for anyone else with something relevant to say, I look forward to hearing from you, mooose

Mar 6, 2007 8:56 pm

Mooose, I have no idea how the work rules at SB function. I'd just like to

impart a bit of advice.



Get into the mindset that you are the owner of Mooose Enterprises (or

whatever you'd like to call it) and are using SB as your support and back

office. If you're serious about this business, and I think you are, this

mindset will goad you into working whatever hours it takes.



Just my $.02......

Mar 6, 2007 9:03 pm

Sorry- he was dead on accurate…..


 <?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />


This is especially true when you are a rookie broker at a large branch.  Average production in my branch is 725K per year…  AVERAGE… 



Try to compete with that..   


Mar 6, 2007 9:19 pm

WTF is going on with rookies concerned with punching a clock? It really demonstrates the lack of understanding with regards to what it takes to make it in this business.


To those who don't get it I offer the following:


JUST REPORT YOUR 40 HOURS A WEEK AND COUNT ON COLLECTING PAY FOR THAT! If you plan on being successful, as has been reiterated on this site NUMBEROUS times, be prepared to put down 40+ hours JUST TO GET BY! This is what it takes! You are no longer a time card puncher. You are more or less a business owner. For those who have an idea what it takes to run a business, you know that 8-5 is not how you make your money. The day doesn't start at 8 and rarely ends at 5. Quite being a little time card punching baby and roll up your sleves. It is people like this that make me realize that I couldn't be a manager. Props to your manager for not smacking you aside the head. In the same breath, shame on him for hiring someone who is concerned with vacation time, hours per week and other things not related to being successful

Mar 6, 2007 9:29 pm
mooose:

hello everyone, I just started with SB (finished my series 7 today) and I am currently working between 45-50 hours a week, more than anyone else in my small office.  I bring this up because of the recent overtime lawsuit that SB had to pay out, this has led my BM to tell to not overextent myself and to work my 40 hours.  However, I am reading between the lines and I keep hearing of all the hours that a new RR has to put in.  I have been very productive in my time, completing all of my tasks, keeping up on the markets and getting a webpage up and running.  How does this overtime ruling affect new hirees in training?  moose


This site has been helpful to me, but for all of you posters who just write absolute garbage, save your time and effort.




My suggestion is to change your mindset from being an employee to being a business owner.  If you can't do that, then you picked the wrong career.

Mar 7, 2007 7:34 am

Guy,


What did yu do? Graduate from Whasamatta U.? Where they say Smart like Moose, Strong like Fox!


You are right, I did waste two posts. They were nothing but good advice, but they bounced off you, because you actually PASSED the 7 and you actually HAVE a job in the industry, not like us other losers.


Good luck, with mental acuity like that, you'll probably go far in the wirehouse environment.

Mar 7, 2007 10:01 am

Good advice on "being a business owner," this is a good perspective to have and I will imply this mentality.  I am not a clock watcher though, was just getting a feel for the compliance of the issue, mooose

Mar 8, 2007 1:13 am
Whomitmayconcer:

Moose,


You just passed your 7, you have to study for you 63 get your life health (get the health while you're there) put together some lists of potential vics and generally, get ready for Hartford(?).


As you may recall from your 7, you are not a broker quite just yet. You need the apprentice period during which there will be corp indoctrination and lemonade chugaluggin contests when at you will run into lots of guys who will tell you how wonderful they are and you aren't.


Keeping up on markets? Why? What do you think you are going to be? A Stockbroker? Your only job for the next number of years is going to be being an asset hunter/gatherer. You are now one of those Geico guys! Nothing wrong with being a caveman, scratching away looking for tubers under the ground, living off nuts and berries and noticing that the brokers that ate such and such a mushroom died dead! (Sorry, I just finished Guns Germs and Steel and I'm on a hunter gatherer riff)


The long hours start when you get your fc number, then they put you into the cold calling boardroom and you start trying to evolve into a farmer.


   you use your tongue prettier than a 20 doller whore.  I'm peckin sh*t w/ the chickens too.


ed

Mar 8, 2007 10:50 am

"you use your tongue prettier than a 20 doller whore."


WOW. Thats a good one...

Mar 13, 2007 12:20 am

Personally, I want to know what these people who claim they they work 13-14 hours/day are doing outside of lying. I am on the phone 8:30, take 15 minutes to eat, and then by 5:30 am hammered and burned to the grindstone. That's 8 hours of straight calling pitching, listening to client's BS about how they don't want to pay etc. I pursue 25 contacts or 150-200 dials whichever comes first.


WTF are you guys who stay in the office 'till 8pm doing? Calling people at home while they're stuck in rush hour? Yeah right!


Get your goals done ona  daily basis then come back on Saturday for 5 hrs and Sunday for 3-4 more. Learn to pace yourself but no so much to where you waste time and sit around twirling on your chair from 6:30 to 8pm while people are eating dinner and driving home.

Mar 13, 2007 5:25 am

anabuhahkuss,


If you are doing 8 hours straight of calling, it means that you aren't successful at getting appointments.   Your days should be spent meeting with people.  When you meet with people, it creates work.  The work should be done by staff or in the evenings.


The most successful guy that I know keeps 8 appointments a day.  He's an anomaly.  From my experience, it seems that one must keep 3 a day to put the odds of success in the reps favor.

Mar 13, 2007 5:28 am

Here's another thought.  God took 6 days to do his job of creating the earth.  Why does anyone think that a successful business can be built with 5 day weeks...especially if the days are 8 hours?


Employees can work 40 hours.  Owners building a business can't.  The question is does someone have an employee mentality or an owner mentality?

Mar 13, 2007 7:40 am
anabuhabkuss:

Personally, I want to know what these people who claim they they work 13-14 hours/day are doing outside of lying. I am on the phone 8:30, take 15 minutes to eat, and then by 5:30 am hammered and burned to the grindstone. That's 8 hours of straight calling pitching, listening to client's BS about how they don't want to pay etc. I pursue 25 contacts or 150-200 dials whichever comes first.


WTF are you guys who stay in the office 'till 8pm doing? Calling people at home while they're stuck in rush hour? Yeah right!


Get your goals done ona  daily basis then come back on Saturday for 5 hrs and Sunday for 3-4 more. Learn to pace yourself but no so much to where you waste time and sit around twirling on your chair from 6:30 to 8pm while people are eating dinner and driving home.



6:30-8: read the journal, firm research, check RR
8-12: one method of prospecting, calling if I have a morning list, perhaps setting up a seminar, team meetings, cold walking
12-1: client/prospect lunch or lunch with partners
1-5: new method of prospecting, if I didn't call earlier, call now
5-8: some combination of working out, attending social functions, volunteering, networking, shaking hands, kissing babies


I do this M-F, then do a lot of volunteer work and networking on Sat. and Sun.  If I had to put an hour figure on work, I'd say 60-70 hours a week I am either at work doing something productive or out pushing my wares.

Mar 13, 2007 1:33 pm

Where in the world are they finding these cocky kids?  Go wipe your nose moose.

Mar 14, 2007 8:17 pm

Anonymous,


Your posts kept me up all night the other night. I want to sincerely thank you. I got caught in a trap of pitching and talking to clients over the phone when I know better. Today, it was all about the appointment and I felt I was more productive today than I've felt in weeks.


Thanks for the reminder: You set the appointment, you gather the assets, you get the production.