If you had it to do all over again

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Mar 10, 2009 4:33 pm

Congrats on your accomplishments. I know of and commend you on the many years of hard work to get to this point.


Here is a chance for you guys to brag on yourself however you choose by telling your story. How did you get where you are today and what would you do different if you had a chance to go back?
 
Post as much or as little as you prefer and thank you for the information I will gather from this.
Mar 10, 2009 4:37 pm

wish i would of been more conservative with client funds

Mar 10, 2009 4:48 pm

I wish I would have made more calls during the earlier years.  I was always told cold calling doesn't work, so for the first 4 years of my career I didn't cold call at all.  I wish I could have that time back.

 
Also I would have done more seminars on an annual basis(at least 6/year).
 
Switched to fee earlier, instead of taking the upfront money..
Mar 10, 2009 5:56 pm

I would have started using index annuities much sooner. 

Mar 10, 2009 6:14 pm

I would have gone indy from day one.

Mar 10, 2009 7:13 pm

I wouldn't have wasted time getting my CPA.

Mar 10, 2009 9:43 pm

Did anybody do anything right? You guys suck stay off my post!!

Mar 10, 2009 10:19 pm
JAXSON:

...what would you do different if you had a chance to go back? 

 
Post as much or as little as you prefer...
 
Uh, I think we followed your instructions.  Don't ask the question if you don't want an answer.  Aside from that, the best lessons I have learned have been from the mistakes of others.
Mar 10, 2009 10:26 pm
Indyone:
JAXSON:

Congrats on your accomplishments. I know of and commend you on the many years of hard work to get to this point.


Here is a chance for you guys to brag on yourself however you choose by telling your story. How did you get where you are today and what would you do different if you had a chance to go back?
 
Post as much or as little as you prefer and thank you for the information I will gather from this.
 
Uh, I think we followed your instructions.  Don't ask the question if you don't want an answer.  Aside from that, the best lessons I have learned have been from the mistakes of others.
I was F'n with you indyone. But I was hoping for a little more positive then negative memories from you all. I guess few are happy with the way they entered and continue to work in this industry.
Mar 10, 2009 10:36 pm
JAXSON:
I was F'n with you indyone. But I was hoping for a little more positive then negative memories from you all. I guess few are happy with the way they entered and continue to work in this industry.



But your opening post asked for what we would change if we could do it over again....

Why would we changed the positive stuff, the stuff that worked?  We wouldn't.  Your question is calling for negative anecdotes.

Mar 10, 2009 10:53 pm
etj4588:
JAXSON:
I was F'n with you indyone. But I was hoping for a little more positive then negative memories from you all. I guess few are happy with the way they entered and continue to work in this industry.



But your opening post asked for what we would change if we could do it over again....

Why would we changed the positive stuff, the stuff that worked?  We wouldn't.  Your question is calling for negative anecdotes.

My question first asks for stories to brag about and accomplishments. I thought about starting a positive post to bring moral up some for you all telling the stories and us newbies that can't get enough info. Then I asked about changes. I thought there would be more positives, but I guess not. All of you must have hated the road to where your at. sh*t man one thing for sure on this site, no one reads the meaning the writer puts in it. I don't care how many ways you write it either. But who cares respond with what you want. As long as people are posting people will respond with something. You decide if you want this to continue negative or you can throw some positives in. 
 
 
Mar 11, 2009 10:01 am

(1)  Brought my estate planning attorney into the picture sooner

 
(2)  More C share/fee based business
 
(3)  Less GMAC bonds
Mar 11, 2009 5:43 pm

OK, here's a positive one:  I'm glad I started from scratch zero and had develop relationships myself to see how hard it is, vs. any other method where you don't understand exactly how valuable a loyal client is (team, bank, discount shop, ie anywhere you get fed someone to talk to).  Having loyal clients and knowing how to get more is ultimate job security.

Mar 11, 2009 6:31 pm

Great post Cowboy. I agree completely. The relationship with the client is the most valuable thing to me. I think that is one thing that scares the hell out of me. I have heard stories were you have to make ethical decisions to put food on the table or not. I am glad I have no bills and can survive on peanuts if need be considering this economy. I feel for the ones that are not financially secure. I know one guy that is cake mixing the piss out of some clients to make a check. I hope he can sleep at night.

 
How long ago did you start your indy business and where did you recieve financial education/training?
Mar 11, 2009 9:35 pm

I would have stayed in the Navy. I would have made flag rank and been retired on an admiral's pension now.

Mar 11, 2009 9:47 pm

I will take a positive bent (and encourage slings and arrows in the process...bring it). I did not allow myself to be cowed by my (or any) firm to transition my business to any fee-based model. Not only is it a screw-job to the client and require re-selling every billing period in a tough market, but I believe that the fee-based model will be the next to attract the attention of aggressive regulation. If I were a discretionary account, fee-based advisor now, I'd be looking over both shoulders.

Mar 11, 2009 10:05 pm

Interesting perspective, YHWY.

Mar 11, 2009 10:23 pm
JAXSON:

Great post Cowboy. I agree completely. The relationship with the client is the most valuable thing to me. I think that is one thing that scares the hell out of me. I have heard stories were you have to make ethical decisions to put food on the table or not. I am glad I have no bills and can survive on peanuts if need be considering this economy. I feel for the ones that are not financially secure. I know one guy that is cake mixing the piss out of some clients to make a check. I hope he can sleep at night.

 
How long ago did you start your indy business and where did you recieve financial education/training?
 






This post hits home with me right now.
 
I passed up a substantial rollover today--and a nice commission I could really use right now--and instead recommended the client take the full company pension. I crunched the numbers every which way but couldn't find a way to beat the guarantees of the pension without taking too much risk and potentially having to do some apologizing in the future.
 
It was tough, but I still believe in karma.
 
(I think I still do, anyway. ) 
Mar 11, 2009 11:13 pm

Good decision Borker.  Never f$%^ with someone's retirement check.  I am in the fortunate situation that one big employer near me has a fat pension but lousy payouts.  I can do better buying an annuity for the client in most cases.  Just comes down to the numbers.

Mar 12, 2009 1:17 am
JAXSON:

Great post Cowboy. I agree completely. The relationship with the client is the most valuable thing to me. I think that is one thing that scares the hell out of me. I have heard stories were you have to make ethical decisions to put food on the table or not. I am glad I have no bills and can survive on peanuts if need be considering this economy. I feel for the ones that are not financially secure. I know one guy that is cake mixing the piss out of some clients to make a check. I hope he can sleep at night.



How long ago did you start your indy business and where did you recieve financial education/training?





I'm not indy...got sales training from a big firm and most of my education reading on my own (a lot more useful than firm stuff or wholesalers, etc). But anyone who has started in a "training" program at a major firm is well aware that you aren't given client one. Doing the right thing is good business anyway---being "long-term greedy" as Goldman's old line goes. The biggest trick right now reminds me of being brand new again: doing enough business the right way to live to fight another day. The demand for advice is going nowhere but up and there will be fewer competitors out there in a few years...a great time to be in this business. Just have to wait a few years to get paid for it being great.