How to tap into my Target Market

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Feb 17, 2009 5:01 pm

So, I have been reading "Book Yourself Solid" and I've been trying to figure out what my target market would be. I had an aha moment today when thinking about VAs and how confusing I thought they were when I first got in the business. I was also thinking about how I talk to clients about them, and how some of my peers would present them. A lot of the times I would see this one guy talk over the clients head. I didn't feel that he was good at understanding clients' questions and confusions on any of the products, really. He was great with his savvy high dollar clients with years of experience, just not quite so much with the blue collar workers or the wife whose deceased husband handled on the finances. I've always had a knack for explaining things on a level clients can understand. This lead me to my aha moment. My target market is exactly that: Middle aged blue collar workers. (and the ocassional wife whose deceased husband handled all the finances.)



Now, I just need to find a way to tap into this market.



Has anyone had success with getting into businesses to do free financial seminars for employees?



Feb 17, 2009 5:07 pm

Go and talk to the local union leaders.  Some of them may be amenable to you offering financial planning seminars to union members.  Most long-time union members will have decent sized 401K's and pensions.  Not huge, but picking up a few hundred grand a pop from retirees' 401K rollovers is not a bad gig if you can do enough of them.

Feb 17, 2009 6:12 pm

Thank you! That's an awesome suggestion. I will definitely try that.

Feb 17, 2009 7:22 pm
Dianna912:

So, I have been reading "Book Yourself Solid" and I've been trying to figure out what my target market would be. I had an aha moment today when thinking about VAs and how confusing I thought they were when I first got in the business. I was also thinking about how I talk to clients about them, and how some of my peers would present them. A lot of the times I would see this one guy talk over the clients head. I didn't feel that he was good at understanding clients' questions and confusions on any of the products, really. He was great with his savvy high dollar clients with years of experience, just not quite so much with the blue collar workers or the wife whose deceased husband handled on the finances. I've always had a knack for explaining things on a level clients can understand. This lead me to my aha moment. My target market is exactly that: Middle aged blue collar workers. (and the ocassional wife whose deceased husband handled all the finances.)

Now, I just need to find a way to tap into this market.

Has anyone had success with getting into businesses to do free financial seminars for employees?

 
I do my local county government's employee education.  It's really a good deal for me, as they have 31 departments and over 275 employees.  It's surprisingly difficult to get in even with a free offer, as I've tried with about six different companies.  I get the impression the HR person thinks he or she'll have to do a little work.  I've got a few that won't even return my calls or emails after I presented our free seminar program.
Feb 22, 2009 10:29 am

Get referred.  Join a BNI or Le Tip style group.


Develop a list of 52 companies and people you want to meet.
Every meeting ask for a referral to one of those people/companies. 
Every 1:1 meeting, reference 2-3 of the companies/people.
Feb 22, 2009 9:12 pm

Here's one of the problems, as I've tried this several times....many of the HR people (and the companies in general) have a non-solicitation policy, and they think that this will be some kind of investment solicitation to their employees.  They don't get that it's purely educational (whiiiiiich.....of course leads to the solicitation when the employee comse to your office!).

 
They are also fearful that they are "endorsing" a firm that may end up- harming their employees and cause them liability.