Wardrobe

or Register to post new content in the forum

68 RepliesJump to last post

 

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Sep 15, 2006 2:11 am

Just a little topic about wardrobes. What does everyone suggestion to have as a "complete" wardrobe for the daily professional?

Sep 15, 2006 6:46 am

While I'm no image consultant, consider the following as a litmus test: Dress in a manner that you would feel completely comfortable for your best client/prospect to come into your office, even if you aren't expecting them.


For me, that consists of conservative, well-fiitted suits.  IMO people WAY underestimate the importance of looking sharp and being in good shape; especially for this business.  How you present yourself tells your client/prospect a lot about you, even if it's on the subconscious level.  The last thing you want is a client to have the impression of "this person can't even take care of themselves.  How are they going to look after my money?"

Sep 15, 2006 9:44 am
The Judge:

IMO people WAY underestimate the importance of looking sharp and being in good shape; especially for this business.  How you present yourself tells your client/prospect a lot about you, even if it's on the subconscious level. 



I completely agree with this.  Looking sharp is very important.  Just wearing a suit is not enough.  The suit should be of good quality and well fitted—ideally they should be custom.  This does not mean you should spend $2k a suit but take a pass on the $200 Macys special.   Check out the series of articles that WSJ ran during fashion week earlier this month.  In particular read “Word on the Street: Our Suit Field Test”.<?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />


 


             Now I have to work on getting myself back in shape.  There have been just too many of these “free” lunches at the lunch meetings.


 


--WM


Sep 15, 2006 9:54 am
Stockjoc:

Just a little topic about wardrobes. What does everyone suggestion to have as a "complete" wardrobe for the daily professional?


I think that a starting financial advisor should purchase three decent suits, one nice suit and one sport coat and slacks or for women, one more casual outfit. You also want to purchase two business casual outfits. At least one suit should be blue, and another grey.


Purchase clothes that are understated and tasteful; You want to look conservative to your prospects. Do not look flashy or decadent. Think Ralph Lauren.

Sep 15, 2006 9:55 am
WealthManager:

<?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />


             Now I have to work on getting myself back in shape.  There have been just too many of these “free” lunches at the lunch meetings.




Isn't that the truth. Build a daily exercise routine into your schedule rookies, or face the "freshman 15".

Sep 15, 2006 10:59 am
san fran broker:
Stockjoc:

Just a little topic about wardrobes. What does everyone suggestion to have as a "complete" wardrobe for the daily professional?


I think that a starting financial advisor should purchase three decent suits, one nice suit and one sport coat and slacks or for women, one more casual outfit. You also want to purchase two business casual outfits. At least one suit should be blue, and another grey.


Purchase clothes that are understated and tasteful; You want to look conservative to your prospects. Do not look flashy or decadent. Think Ralph Lauren.




But not the shirts with the logo 

Sep 15, 2006 11:17 am

Go for a custom (called "Made to Measure" in the trade) suit if you can afford it.  There is a big difference.

If you're exceptionally big or tall, you should definitely get your suits made to measure.  Not only are they less expensive than high-end retail Big & Tall, but you can change your image from "big guy in a dumpy suit" to "prosperous".

There are several custom tailors from Hong Kong who tour the US, taking measurements.  They eMail the measurements back to their shops in Hong Kong or Kowloon, where your suits or shirts are made.

If you buy locally, you will benefit from multiple fittings.  But you will also pay three times as much.

Cost of suits vary with the material you choose.  But for purpose of illustration:  A shirt in my size, french cuffs, custom made in sea island cotton costs $65 from these guys.  The same quality shirt costs over $120 off the shelf at Rochester.

Sep 15, 2006 11:41 am

I had never heard of getting the custom shirts from guys in Hong Kong until a friend told me about it.  Same story as Jeff:  Really, REALLY nice custom dress shirt, about $70.

Sep 15, 2006 11:42 am

Wealthy U.S. clients still love Brooks Brothers. It says old money!!! Also the shoes should be conservative. Forget the loafers unless it is business casual.


Need I say this? Take your shirts to the dry cleaners.

Sep 15, 2006 12:28 pm

The dry cleaners just shrunk 3 of my shirts.  I need to find a nice sweat-shop.  THAT'S where you really get the quality!

Sep 15, 2006 4:15 pm

it depends on where you are located.  I'm in rural usa and wearing dockers and a polo right now.  If I had on a suit, I'd look ridiculous. 

Sep 15, 2006 4:45 pm

What color underwear are you wearing?     Just kidding.


I agree that a suit can look ridiculous in some areas of the country.  We have had this discussion before, but we should always try to look our best no matter if we are in the office or at the grocery store.


I usually wear either dressy skirt/jacket combos with heels, a dress with jacket or nice pants suits with heels when I am in the office.  But if I am going to meet someone at their place of business....it depends on what type of business and where I will be meeting them as to whether I will dress down.


I'm dressed down now with navy slacks, a raspberry rayon surplice top and navy heels.


Black...that's the answer

Sep 15, 2006 5:34 pm
FreedomLvr:

The dry cleaners just shrunk 3 of my shirts.  I need to find a nice sweat-shop.  THAT'S where you really get the quality!



You could call Cathy Lee Gifford for a referral

Sep 15, 2006 11:59 pm

Interesting topic.  A few thoughts...


I am personally coming from experience with two of the major i-banks, in a non-FA role, but now entering an FA role at another major i-bank/wirehouse (what-have-you).


In my first two positions, the attire was strictly business casual.  In my most recent position, we occasionally had client/prospect meetings in office, for which we wore a suit.  However, when the industry in general moved to "business casual" attire, it was due largely to the fact that people thought it made clients feel more comfortable.  I tend to agree with this.


Secondly, since I'm now moving to a "business formal" environment, I've been on the hunt for a few new suits.  I bought three in the past week (two today).  All three are what I would call pretty decent suits - as in, "I'm 26 and would be out of my mind to buy the $1200 Armani, therefore I bought some designer brands that were reasonably priced."  Jos. A Bank was the first stop, and I found a pretty good deal on a nice quality suit - all in all, it was on sale for about $200.  I found two others today at Macy's for a bit more each - a CK and a Michael Kors.


Personally, I see nothing wrong with buying the "Macy's special" - they tend to carry nice designers, as do most of the men's clothing stores.  When I'm a bit older and wiser, I'll start treating myself to the $800 Brooks Brothers suit, but right now, I see no justification in spending that kind of money on one suit.


To each their own, but you honestly cannot tell the difference between a $300 suit and a $700 suit, IMHO, unless your clients make a habit of grabbing the inside of your jacket to check the tag.    

Sep 16, 2006 12:00 am
babbling looney:

What color underwear are you wearing?     Just kidding.


I agree that a suit can look ridiculous in some areas of the country.  We have had this discussion before, but we should always try to look our best no matter if we are in the office or at the grocery store.


I usually wear either dressy skirt/jacket combos with heels, a dress with jacket or nice pants suits with heels when I am in the office.  But if I am going to meet someone at their place of business....it depends on what type of business and where I will be meeting them as to whether I will dress down.


I'm dressed down now with navy slacks, a raspberry rayon surplice top and navy heels.


Black...that's the answer



no golf shirts, right?

Sep 16, 2006 12:10 am
joedabrkr:

no golf shirts, right?


...Joe's got a good memory...

Sep 16, 2006 11:58 am
Indyone:
joedabrkr:

no golf shirts, right?


...Joe's got a good memory...



Correct. No golf  or polo shirts...ever.  However, a nicely fitted jersey knit type t shirt with a vee or scoop neckline is a much more tailored and flattering look for me.


Seriously, I  have no problem with business casual as long as men or women don't come off looking frumpy and rumpled.  I have seen some men who should not be wearing knitted shirts which show off their middle age spread.   Unlike our dear departed Put/NASD Newbie, I do think that it is acceptable to be out of uniform (Suit etc) occasionally and when appropriate to the location or event.

Sep 16, 2006 12:21 pm

Middle, age, and spread are three words that just shouldn't be used in the same sentence.

Sep 16, 2006 1:39 pm

I think that the key issue is dressing in a manner that makes your clients most comfortable.


Certainly, around here, people have become considerably more conservative in their dress in last few years, but it would be inappropriate to wear a suit for a "casual" meeting in Silicon Valley. By the same token, I think its appropriate to wear a suit for a "formal presentation".


Ultimately, clients are receptive to people who are "like them", so your guidelines should be based on the behavior of your clientele...

Sep 16, 2006 1:41 pm
babbling looney:

I usually wear either dressy skirt/jacket combos with heels, a dress with jacket or nice pants suits with heels when I am in the office.



I take it that you are a woman.


Important Note: Male rookies - do not wear high heels to work.