OT: Mint Julep

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Mar 2, 2007 9:40 pm


[quote]"You
can't be a genuine citizen of Louisville unless you drink one mint
julep a year," Mike Bosc, vice president of media relations for Greater
Louisville Inc., boldly declares.



For most, that duty usually falls on Derby Day, he says. So why don't they sip juleps with abandon the rest of the year?



"Because there are better-tasting drinks," Bosc responds.[/quote]


http://www.enquirer.com/editions/2003/04/30/tem_food30lede.h tml


The real problem is that most people make them too sweet.


Chill the glasses.
Use good fresh mint, the younger leaves have the cleanest flavor
Clean ice made with clean water.


Muddle the mint with the sugar and little bourbon at the bottom of the glass.
Add lots of crushed ice
Add lots of bourbon and stir.


Add more ice.
Top with mint.


Mar 9, 2007 8:11 pm

I hate seeing good bourbon ruined with sugar and mint leaves!

Mar 10, 2007 12:20 am
Mandoman:

I hate seeing good bourbon ruined with sugar and mint leaves!





Skip the mint, add a dash of bitters and you have an old fashioned.

Mar 11, 2007 9:30 pm
AllREIT:

"You can't be a genuine citizen of Louisville unless you drink one mint julep a year," Mike Bosc, vice president of media relations for Greater Louisville Inc., boldly declares.


For most, that duty usually falls on Derby Day, he says. So why don't they sip juleps with abandon the rest of the year?


"Because there are better-tasting drinks," Bosc responds.


http://www.enquirer.com/editions/2003/04/30/temfood30lede.h tml


The real problem is that most people make them too sweet.



Chill the glasses.
Use good fresh mint, the younger leaves have the cleanest flavor
Clean ice made with clean water.

Muddle the mint with the sugar and little bourbon at the bottom of the glass.
Add lots of crushed ice
Add lots of bourbon and stir.

Add more ice.
Top with mint.


Here's a variation.  Muddle the water for the ice. and Walla!  You have for yourself a very fine Dirty Mint Julep--dirtylicious. (Might need a chaser of antibiotics afterwards though.)  Hurricane drinks are famous in Louisiana.  I went there once on leave with friends --we went to a bar and a guy was playing the piano and another one was ...you'll never guess, he was playing a PIZZA Pan.  He was tapping his fingers on the bottom of this pan -- really kool music, too.  Somehow, I don't think it would have sounded as good without the piano accompaniment, though.   


Hey, look ma, no underlines. But I have to use two hands.