Fire or hold on?

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Jan 25, 2007 6:15 pm

I have a horrific BOA I want to fire, but am leaving Jones in 6-8 months.  My thought is that by the time I go through the firing process - 2 months, the hiring process - 2 months, and the training process - 2 months, it will be time to go.  Shouldn't I just gut it out and let the next newbie deal with it?  Plus none of my clients will be stay at Jones for the current BOA, so that could be a plus. 


Thanks   

Jan 25, 2007 6:32 pm

Tough it out and leave the horrific BOA to give the new guy grief.  He'll be so consumed listening to her bad mouth you that he won't have time to chase all of the accounts leaving via ACAT.

Jan 25, 2007 7:35 pm

gad12,


You don't say if you're leaving the business or going to a wirehouse or going indie. If indie, fire the BOA and take this time to find a good BOA to take with you.

Jan 25, 2007 8:01 pm

That would be smart.


Going indy.  However my most likely destination is to join a current RJ advisor.  He'll let me get some help from his assistant until I'm comfortable I can afford my own.  Probably 1 to 2 yrs away.  (Still a relatively small producer.)


BTW I get along fine with my BOA, she is just too old to learn how to do anything right.

Jan 26, 2007 7:37 pm
gad12:

BTW I get along fine with my BOA, she is just too old to learn how to do anything right.



Ha, ha, I have this mental picture of gad12's "elderly" BOA holding a horn to her ear yelling WHAT? WHAT? Also, let's not forget about her regaling gad12 about the good ole days and that 3-day supply of adult diapers in the supply closet.

Jan 26, 2007 9:39 pm

  You know Dob, closer to the truth than you probably even realize

Jan 27, 2007 12:18 am

[quote=gad12]

"BTW I get along fine with my BOA, she is just too old to learn how to do anything right".


Are you sure she is too old to learn anything new or do you BELIEVE she is too old to learn anything new??


And finally does she not want to learn anything new??

Jan 27, 2007 1:28 am
gad12:

I have a horrific BOA I want to fire, but am leaving Jones in 6-8 months.  My thought is that by the time I go through the firing process - 2 months, the hiring process - 2 months, and the training process - 2 months, it will be time to go.  Shouldn't I just gut it out and let the next newbie deal with it?  Plus none of my clients will be stay at Jones for the current BOA, so that could be a plus. 


Thanks   



Fire her 30-45 days before you leave and drag your feet on the hiring process.

Jan 27, 2007 1:34 am
joedabrkr:


Fire her 30-45 days before you leave and drag your feet on the hiring process.










Jan 27, 2007 9:54 am
Biasedrecruiter:

Are you sure she is too old to learn anything new or do you BELIEVE she is too old to learn anything new??


And finally does she not want to learn anything new??



Well, I don't know if it's the age, (over 65), or just her, but believe me she can't remeber details of things she did an hour ago and I've had to walk her through basic tasks 5 plus times before she can remeber how to do them.  And even then she messes things up.  I've taken over all tasks of any importance. (i.e. check requests, etc.) 


She is very nice, likes her job and tries very hard.  Personally I get along with her just great. 




JOE, that thought crossed my mind, but #1 seems a little bit of a low blow and #2 I worry that I could get in some kind of trouble because of it. 


Do you really think it would be a good idea?  Or were you just joking?


BTW - Obviously I'm an idiot for hiring her.  However in my defense, she came highly recommended from a local BOA (means nothing), aced the written exam and has a good personality.  Plus I was desperate after months of being without.  (Max pay in our area will not atract good candidates.)  Still I made a bad choice, I must confess.

Jan 27, 2007 11:18 am
gad12:
Biasedrecruiter:

Are you sure she is too old to learn anything new or do you BELIEVE she is too old to learn anything new??


And finally does she not want to learn anything new??



Well, I don't know if it's the age, (over 65), or just her, but believe me she can't remeber details of things she did an hour ago and I've had to walk her through basic tasks 5 plus times before she can remeber how to do them.  And even then she messes things up.  I've taken over all tasks of any importance. (i.e. check requests, etc.) 


She is very nice, likes her job and tries very hard.  Personally I get along with her just great. 




JOE, that thought crossed my mind, but #1 seems a little bit of a low blow and #2 I worry that I could get in some kind of trouble because of it. 


Do you really think it would be a good idea?  Or were you just joking?


BTW - Obviously I'm an idiot for hiring her.  However in my defense, she came highly recommended from a local BOA (means nothing), aced the written exam and has a good personality.  Plus I was desperate after months of being without.  (Max pay in our area will not atract good candidates.)  Still I made a bad choice, I must confess.



You may want to surprise her with a sudden blast from an air horn, so she has a heart attack and dies.

Jan 27, 2007 11:53 am
My Inner Child:
gad12:
Biasedrecruiter:

Are you sure she is too old to learn anything new or do you BELIEVE she is too old to learn anything new??


And finally does she not want to learn anything new??



Well, I don't know if it's the age, (over 65), or just her, but believe me she can't remeber details of things she did an hour ago and I've had to walk her through basic tasks 5 plus times before she can remeber how to do them.  And even then she messes things up.  I've taken over all tasks of any importance. (i.e. check requests, etc.) 


She is very nice, likes her job and tries very hard.  Personally I get along with her just great. 




JOE, that thought crossed my mind, but #1 seems a little bit of a low blow and #2 I worry that I could get in some kind of trouble because of it. 


Do you really think it would be a good idea?  Or were you just joking?


BTW - Obviously I'm an idiot for hiring her.  However in my defense, she came highly recommended from a local BOA (means nothing), aced the written exam and has a good personality.  Plus I was desperate after months of being without.  (Max pay in our area will not atract good candidates.)  Still I made a bad choice, I must confess.



You may want to surprise her with a sudden blast from an air horn, so she has a heart attack and dies.



You know, that might actually be a great idea.

Jan 27, 2007 12:29 pm

It's probably not a good idea to put your clients through the termoil of a new BOA and then make a move.  Plus, if you hire someone new, and then leave them behind ... well, that's just not very nice.  A BOA that likes you, left behind, can be a tremendous asset when you make a move.

Jan 27, 2007 12:31 pm

turmoil

Jan 27, 2007 12:48 pm
eyes wide open:

  A BOA that likes you, left behind, can be a tremendous asset when you make a move.



What do you mean?

Jan 27, 2007 4:54 pm
joedabrkr:

Fire her 30-45 days before you leave and drag your feet on the hiring process.


I like the way you think, my brotha! You and me think alike.


I've got a former partner whose practice is going up in flames, as I speak, and I couldn't be happier. (This former partner tried to scr*w me after we joined with another broker, some 8 years ago. I left after just 1 year.) Long story short, between the IRS liens on his business and now the bank beginning foreclosure procedures, he's practically finished. Oh Happy Day!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Jan 27, 2007 8:46 pm

My BOA stayed behind (had some health issues and didn't want the change) but was very co-operative about handling transfers quickly and efficiently and didn't bad mouth me.  Very helpful.

Jan 27, 2007 9:19 pm

I'm leaving my BOA when I move.  Training a new assistant.  I want a fresh new face to greet my clients in MY new office.  I just don't want any baggage from the loser firm.  SHe's drunk on kool ade half the time. 

Feb 8, 2007 6:16 pm

Just another day of suffering through her incompetence.


To be honest, either I will fire her or the next broker will.  It's just a matter of when. 


If I tell her it's time to start looking for another job and then she leaves a few months before I do and I don't replace her, do you really think that  would be a good idea?  


Could I get in any trouble for that? 


Feb 8, 2007 7:49 pm

What you're proposing might come back to haunt you, so tread carefully. Contact your B/D and tell them that you want to dismiss your BOA. They should have specific procedures for dismissing your BOA and following these procedures may keep you out of trouble.


By trouble, I mean the soon-to-be ex-BOA suing you for wrongful termination and/or filing for unemployment. Your B/D could easily transfer these costs to your office or any settlement, once you leave the firm.


So, if you terminate (prior to leaving the B/D), make sure you go by the book.