The best job in the whole wide world

or Register to post new content in the forum

123 RepliesJump to last post

 

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Aug 16, 2006 9:42 am

For those of you who worry and fret about passing the series 6, 7, 63, or 65/66 and whine about how hard this job might be, well now here is a job for you. No college degree needed and no license required, you get to work with a name brand company that everyone knows. The best part about this job is you don't have to slave over trades 60 hours a week or run abound and bang on doors to let people know you just opened an office just down the street.


 


Hurry this won't last forever.


 


http://www.careerbuilder.com/JobSeeker/Jobs/JobDetails.aspx? IPath=JRG&jobcount=62&jobdid=J8G24X6R7GFZVH63N3M&am p;sfascc=&dv=dv&jrdid=&lpage=3&sname=&Ci BookMark=1&strcrit=QID%3dA6650223156611%3bst%3dA%3buse%3 dALL%3bTID%3d59282%3bCTY%3dSAN+ANTONIO%3bSID%3dTX%3bCID%3dUS %3bENR%3dNO%3bDTP%3dDR3%3bYDI%3dYES%3bIND%3dALL%3bPDQ%3dAll% 3bJN%3dAll%3bPAYL%3d0%3bPAYH%3dGT120%3bPOY%3dNO%3bETD%3dALL% 3bRE%3dALL%3bMGT%3dDC%3bSUP%3dDC%3bFRE%3d7%3bCHL%3dAL%3bQS%3 dHHR_JOBRESULTS.ASP%3bSS%3dNO%3bTITL%3d0%3bJQT%3dRAD%3bNVJTL %3d%5eJN005%24

Aug 16, 2006 9:50 am

They forgot make coffee, buy doughnuts, shine shoes and clean up the vomit that's being spewed.

Aug 16, 2006 9:54 am

Here we go again--fools sneering at things that should not be sneered at.


Being an intern at Scottrade is a far better college job than being a cold call cowboy in a chop shop--and will actually provide a more well rounded look at the business than being a cold caller at a wirehouse.

Aug 16, 2006 10:03 am

Newbie,



You fail to see my point of giving all of those who cry about "I can't pass the test" or "that seems like a lot of work" someplace to apply. Yes this post was done in fun, so stop trying to make it more than it is.

Aug 16, 2006 11:18 am

I was referring to the reference to cleaning up vomit--what do you suppose that meant?

Aug 16, 2006 11:39 am
SA_Jim:

Newbie,

You fail to see my point of giving all of those who cry about "I can't pass the test" or "that seems like a lot of work" someplace to apply. Yes this post was done in fun, so stop trying to make it more than it is.



This message is to all of the potential entry-level brokers out there:

If you can't pass the test, then get out of this business.  You'll never make any real money without a NASD license.

If you're afraid of hard work, then RUN!  Do not walk.

There is one universal trait that I see among successful brokers.  They have overcome their fear of failure.

This does not mean that they are reckless.  They are all very aware of the consequences of failure.  Despite this knowledge, they move forward every day without hesitation.

If you don't overcome your fear of failure very early in the learning process, then you will fail.  The NASD exams and the workload are just the first of many obstacles.  How can you expect to run someday if you're obviously too afraid to walk?


Aug 16, 2006 12:08 pm

Jeff, have you not gotten the message---there are a bunch of whimpering types who don't like to read things like, "Will fail."


Especially if you're not a producer between the ages of 23 and 35--when you shouldn't even be in the business in the first place.

Aug 16, 2006 2:18 pm

How about 22?

Aug 16, 2006 2:21 pm
NASD Newbie:

I was referring to the reference to cleaning up vomit--what do you suppose that meant?


Perhaps it was not meant to be serious.


Out of curiosity, NASD, how long have you been in the business and how old were you when you started? 

Aug 16, 2006 4:30 pm

The silence is deafening newbie.  Don't like to answer tough questions, do you?

Aug 16, 2006 4:53 pm

As far as age is concerned, I think I can provide a decent perspective. 


I'm 29 with a wife and two kids and got into the business at 25.  In retrospect I would have waited quite a few years (at least 5 to 10 years) so my social networks could develop as well as my own personal situation (young kids are a MAJOR liability if you are interested in actually being a parent).  Also it is much more challenging to convince prospects to turn over their financial lives to a younger individual no matter how articulate you are (don't give me the B.S about it all "attitude" etc.....) since the majority of them are over 50.  It certainly can be done ( the vast majority of my clients are 55 plus), but is much more challenging.  If you are young you also are still working out who you are in this world and finding your life patterns.  Needless to say, I love this work but am seriously considering jumping ship (out of the brokerage world) and hoping that I may one day return with a deck stacked more in my favor.


Do not take this career lightly, it is getting more challenging by the day and is requiring a broader set of skills than the stockbroker of old.


I get the feeling there are a lot of kids out there with eyes bigger than their stomachs.

Aug 16, 2006 5:01 pm
hubbabubba:

The silence is deafening newbie.  Don't like to answer tough questions, do you?


What's the tough question?

Aug 16, 2006 5:11 pm
BrokerRecruit:
NASD Newbie:

I was referring to the reference to cleaning up vomit--what do you suppose that meant?


Perhaps it was not meant to be serious.


Out of curiosity, NASD, how long have you been in the business and how old were you when you started? 



NASD:


Here's a little help from your friends little guy.  Looks like the 60's were really good to you.

Aug 16, 2006 5:23 pm

Out of curiosity, NASD, how long have you been in the business and how old were you when you started? 


Must I explain everything to you, newbie?  Now answer Broker Recruit's question.

Aug 16, 2006 5:34 pm
hubbabubba:

Out of curiosity, NASD, how long have you been in the business and how old were you when you started? 


Must I explain everything to you, newbie?  Now answer Broker Recruit's question.



I got registered when I was twenty six, and I retired with thirty five years of service.


I became a member of the President's club in my second full year and was in it for the balance of my time in production.


I was way too young to be truly effective--but I was well connected because of my college activities.


Nobody should consider this business until they're at least thirty-five unless there are other factors at work in your favor.  The child of a rich family, the child of a well known local personality, a college sports star--that sort of thing.


If that's not there you're crazy to even try before you have credibility.

Aug 16, 2006 6:04 pm

Although a little extreme, NASD's insights are pretty spot on.  Take heed young broker wannabe's.

Aug 16, 2006 9:11 pm

I can think of better jobs. When I find it, I'm gone.

Aug 17, 2006 12:18 am

Dude, would your mentality change if you didn't have kids to feed and a wife to take care of?

Aug 17, 2006 8:57 pm

Partially, but not much.  NASD is mostly right on this one.  Build your networks, reputation, communication and sales skills before you try this career out.  You MUST hit the ground sprinting from day one without hesitation with the stamina and skills to finish the race.  To do that you must be prepared or you loose.

Aug 17, 2006 9:08 pm
ezmoney:

I can think of better jobs. When I find it, I'm gone.



Bro with your attitude that would probably be a GREAT idea!