Asset Allocation MFDs Help

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Aug 25, 2006 2:55 pm

Does anyone know of any mutual fund asset allocation funds that have reportable track records of 5 years or more?  I don't think any exist.  It shows a 10 yr Lipper rating for some reason but it has only been around for 2003.  Idex is only three years also.


I want to clean up some dead small accounts and get them into the same fund that is all-in-one so I can keep better track of things. 

Aug 25, 2006 2:56 pm

Oops...that was the Ivy Asset Strategy Fund I was referring to with the 10yr Lipper rating  

Aug 25, 2006 3:08 pm

WM Funds have some great allocation products.  Definitely check them out.

Aug 25, 2006 3:20 pm

www.accesssor.com is worth a look....

Aug 25, 2006 3:36 pm

Franklin Templeton.

Aug 25, 2006 3:52 pm

Franklins Templetons' Founding Funds strategy is a winner, but it is not really an 'allocation' fund per se.

Aug 25, 2006 3:54 pm

WM's allocation funds have been around for over 5 years.  Franklin Templetons' Founding Funds has been around for 3 years but it's constituent funds have been around for 50 plus years.

Aug 25, 2006 5:01 pm

You can check out putnams as well. Not that I ever sold any.

Aug 25, 2006 5:21 pm

Evergreen Asset Allocation (EAAFX) just celebrated 10 years.

Aug 25, 2006 5:57 pm

Putnam's allocation funds suck compared to WM and Franklin Templeton.

Aug 26, 2006 10:52 am

Most of the ones that have been around for 5+ years aren't really true asset allocation funds and are only a "fund of funds" like FT's Founding Funds.  You're essentially getting 3 funds with one ticket drop, but there's not management going on or daily asset allocation.


TransAmerica IDEX mutual funds (allocation done by Morningstar) have been around since 3/02, so we're almost up to the 5yr point with them. 

Aug 26, 2006 4:20 pm

WM Funds were some of the first to introduce a traditional "allocation fund", I'm sure they have a few with 10 year track records (or close).

Aug 26, 2006 5:00 pm
blue:

You can check out putnams as well. Not that I ever sold any.


Putnam's Growth Strategy has been outstanding.  Just out of 5-star territory for 1,3, and 5 year periods.  I also like Goldman's strategy funds.  Finally, I would recommend John Hancock's newer product that utilizes several different money managers (24, I believe) screened by Deutche Bank. 

Aug 26, 2006 5:02 pm
dude:

WM Funds have some great allocation products.  Definitely check them out.


WM Fund group was recently sold off from WaMu.  I would steer clear.

Aug 26, 2006 5:04 pm
The Judge:

Evergreen Asset Allocation (EAAFX) just celebrated 10 years.


It is also important to note that Grantham and crew has never had a negative performance year over those 10 years--including 2001 and 2002.

Aug 26, 2006 5:06 pm
dude:

Putnam's allocation funds suck compared to WM and Franklin Templeton.


The numbers don't bear that out.  That is your perception.  In the "What Have You Done For Me Lately" period, Putnam is giving WM a pretty swift ass-kicking.

Aug 26, 2006 5:07 pm

Why could an investor not determine which funds perform best on his own?


Why should he pay a fee to somebody who does little more than subscribe to Morningstar and Lipper?

Aug 26, 2006 5:40 pm
NASD Newbie:

Why could an investor not determine which funds perform best on his own?


Why should he pay a fee to somebody who does little more than subscribe to Morningstar and Lipper?



Because they work all day.  And when they get done doing whatever it is that they are good at, they would rather come home and help their kids with homework.  Or volunteer at the library.  Or go to dinner with their spouse or a group of friends.  They'll leave the screening of mutual funds to the guy who subscribes to Morningstar or Lipper.  They have better things to do. 

Aug 26, 2006 5:46 pm
Soothsayer:
NASD Newbie:

Why could an investor not determine which funds perform best on his own?


Why should he pay a fee to somebody who does little more than subscribe to Morningstar and Lipper?



Because they work all day.  And when they get done doing whatever it is that they are good at, they would rather come home and help their kids with homework.  Or volunteer at the library.  Or go to dinner with their spouse or a group of friends.  They'll leave the screening of mutual funds to the guy who subscribes to Morningstar or Lipper.  They have better things to do. 



Ah, I see.  Do you think they'll reconsider that if their funds lose 20% in a year?

Aug 26, 2006 5:55 pm

In my initial consultations I usually talk about fees early in the conversation.


I tell them; "Look, you can do this on your own and it will be less expensive.  If you decide to hire me to help you it will cost you an additional 1 to 1.5% per year depending on what exactly we do."


After this we usually move on with the process.


scrim