Any prior insurance salespeople?

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Feb 11, 2007 10:45 pm

My question: Why did you transition over to being an fa?


Is being an fa more lucrative than selling insurance (or having a fa franchise more lucrative than having your own insurance agency?)


I know someone who is selling insurance and I wanted to encourage him to transition over to being an fa is this is a better career field.


Interested in hearing from anyone who was a previous insurance sales person.


Thx. 

Feb 12, 2007 6:43 am

Financial planning needs to start with protection, savings, and guarantees. 

Feb 12, 2007 10:55 am

Wow: I thought my question was pretty straight forward.


I wasn't asking about financial planning.


Has anyone compared the benefits of being a licensed insurance salesman with being a fa?  that was the question.


Feb 12, 2007 11:08 am

And Anon gave you an answer. He is saying that the basis of the business is in the insurance area. What this means is that it has the broadest base of clients, generally that means that there is more money to be made there.


Mr. A

Feb 12, 2007 11:24 am

ok, not being an fa geek, his answer zoomed over my head.


It seems that fa's are licensed to do both and maybe this is where the money is at instead of specifically insurance but I'll pass this info on that he is in the right career field but probably wouldn't hurt to get an fa license, too.


Seems an fa would make more than someone selling auto insurance but when you add the other products to the mix, Health, life, property... anyway, thanks.


It also seems that selling insurance (just being an insurance salesperson) is less stressful.  There was an fa at ameriprise who committed suicide and offed his wife and daughter.  I would imagine that being an fa is VERY stressful...unless you are a successful franchise owner.


Thank you.  I appreciate your "professional" answer.

Feb 12, 2007 11:28 am

hey, can see that you are a very professional dude, too--like u better without the exhibitionist ganster rapp although not that there's anything wrong with that.


Good luck in your profession.  Have enjoyed your posts but too bad u can't search on posts without having to read entire streams.  

Feb 12, 2007 12:05 pm

Just to be clear...


James Brown, Barry White, these are the persons that characterization was based upon.


Frank Zappa's Dinah Mo Humm was the song referred to. None of these names are associated with gangsta rap.


Just to be clear.


Just to be clear, the reason for the characterization was to show the  road ragers here that there was a much better way of dealing with an obtrusive newbie than just gang flaming him/her.


The thread reminded me of the old saying "Patience is a virtue in the guy behind you and a curse in the guy in front of you!" You are just learning to drive and you had the radio blaring and a Jesus Saves  and a  Eat My Shorts bumper sticker on the back of your old beater hooptie. You're at the stop light and it turned green, someone beeped you and instead of stepping on the gas, you flicked a booger out the window onto his windshield and purposely drove at 7 miles an hour in a no passing zone!


There are two ways to deal with a person like that. Get mad or just laugh. I figure that you can't push a string, so I prefer to make the situation comical. (At least comical to me!)


Mr. A


Feb 12, 2007 12:35 pm

Just to be clear:  I take back anything nice I said about you.


Some of you really know how to take the "high" road.

Feb 12, 2007 1:16 pm

Practically ALL newbies are obtrusive. The name of the game is to be noticed in all ways.


When a go getter goes to get something, they want the goal to know that they're the one to be the getee in this deal.


I give you credit for having made a name for yourself early on. Scroll through the list and see how many topics have 0 responses.


This is a place where people with big egos let their Id run wild. We got alpha dogs by the score, you managed to become a name in one day. 


I don't know if you're a put-on or for real. If you're a put on, my hat's off to you you put on a heck of a show. If you're for realeo, sameo sameo! 


Mr. A

Feb 12, 2007 2:37 pm
mranonymous2u:

Just to be clear...


James Brown, Barry White, these are the persons that characterization was based upon.





You've gone entirely off the deep end.

Feb 12, 2007 2:53 pm

What's it to you?


Mr. A

Feb 12, 2007 5:11 pm

For what it is worth....I have been employed by a large (very large) insurance company for my entire career (26 years). The General Agency allows us to use most products on the market.


I even shoot a bit of Nerf basketball in my office every day...just as I did in 1980!



The FP portion of my job represents about 25% of the income.  Only speaking for me, but I would not have done it any differently.



Peace to all as Iran presses on...we must stop them.



 And that's not to suggest that anybody else should take the route I did. To each their own.

Feb 12, 2007 5:43 pm

There are so many avenues you can take in both the insurance and securities world. I started my career in a bank, then went on to a large life insurance company and am now in a family owned property and casualty insurance agency.


I can't really begin to say what will make you the most money, what I can say is that it ultimately boils down to your discipline and hard work. I've seen people everywhere I've been pulling over 6 figures a year doing completely different things. The one thing they have in common that makes them successful is that they are hard working and put a lot of time and effort into their careers.


I chose P&C insurance because of the renewal income. To be honest, I am a bit lazy, and don't want to work as hard as I am now in 5 or 6 years. However, I am also an active RIA primarily in an employee benefits role with my larger commercial clients.   


What I'm trying to say is your buddy really has to choose what he likes doing the most and commit himself completely.

Feb 18, 2007 12:52 pm
Madison:

Just to be clear: I take back anything nice I said about

you.



Some of you really know how to take the "high" road.





Wonderful!



Bye bye then!