72(t)

or Register to post new content in the forum

10 RepliesJump to last post

 

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Apr 13, 2009 12:02 pm

I don't know why I am so confused by this right now, but I am.

 
When doing a 72(t), does "substantially equal payments" mean same dollar figure or same percentage?
 
Example:  Client has $1,000,000 IRA.  They do a 72(t) and the calculation comes out to 4.3%.  So the first year they get $43,000.  Over the year, the IRA goes up to $1,050,000.  Do they still get $43,000 or is it $45,150?
Apr 13, 2009 12:30 pm

It depends on which method the client chooses to use.  If he uses the life excectancy model you need to recalculate every year.  If he uses the annuitization or amortization method the check will remain the same.  Sounds like you're using the life expentancy model and the client would get the $45,150 in year two. 

Apr 13, 2009 12:30 pm

43k.  Whenever you set up a 72t,  I would recommend you pull some money out and place it into a second ira.  This way if they have an emergency, they have money they can tap and not effect the 72t distribution.

Apr 13, 2009 12:31 pm

BTW, I agree with henry on the second IRA.  Clients may be able to sit across the desk from you and tell you that they can survive on the $43K you're going to send them, but then they'll "need" a new boat or a trip to New Zealand and want to hit the account for more money.  They're screwed if they mess with the 72t. 

Apr 13, 2009 1:15 pm

Thanks guys.  I have a call-in lead that is 52, wants to retire at 55 with a 72(t) from an annuity he would fund now.

 
He has been a DIYer and knows just enough to be very dangerous.  I would like to tell him he's a moron and needs to keep working, but these DIYer's aren't always that accepting of good advice.
Apr 13, 2009 1:38 pm

Echo.  Absolutely set up the separate IRA (2), with only the amount needed in IRA (1) to fund the 72(t).  I have done a handful of 72(t)'s, and they ALWAYS need more money.  Crushing the 72(t) can be a financial disaster (tax-wise).

Apr 14, 2009 10:38 pm
snaggletooth:

Thanks guys. I have a call-in lead that is 52, wants to retire at 55 with a 72(t) from an annuity he would fund now.



He has been a DIYer and knows just enough to be very dangerous. I would like to tell him he's a moron and needs to keep working, but these DIYer's aren't always that accepting of good advice.





Nothing big, but annuity contracts work under a 72(q) rule not 72(t).



C

Apr 15, 2009 12:30 pm
Captain:
snaggletooth:

Thanks guys.  I have a call-in lead that is 52, wants to retire at 55 with a 72(t) from an annuity he would fund now.

 

He has been a DIYer and knows just enough to be very dangerous.  I would like to tell him he's a moron and needs to keep working, but these DIYer's aren't always that accepting of good advice.



Nothing big, but annuity contracts work under a 72(q) rule not 72(t).

C

 
I thought 72(q) was for non-qualified annuities and that 72(t) was for retirement accounts, which takes precedence when an annuity is in it.  Is that not correct?
Apr 19, 2009 7:56 am

True. I thought we were talking about someone who maxed out qualified options and were resorting to a NQ annuity option for early withdrawals. But, this is all IRA money, as I've now read the entire post. Silly me.



C

Apr 20, 2009 11:36 pm

On a related note you can do annuitized living benefit annuities pre 59 1/2 like Lincoln i4Life and avoid the 72Q hassle cause it does it automatically.