Structured Products: Devil in the Details

Investor sentiment, a powerful driver of financial markets, often toggles between the twin poles of greed and fear. During the bull market of 1995 to 2000, for example, when U.S. equity prices returned more than 20 percent per year, the standard question from investors was, How much can I make? Times have changed and so did investor concerns. The S&P 500 fell 42 percent from January 2000 through the

Investor sentiment, a powerful driver of financial markets, often toggles between the twin poles of greed and fear. During the bull market of 1995 to 2000, for example, when U.S. equity prices returned more than 20 percent per year, the standard question from investors was, “How much can I make?”

Times have changed and so did investor concerns. The S&P 500 fell 42 percent from January 2000 through the first quarter of 2003. As markets endured their “perfect storm” of economic unce

All access premium subscription

Your subscription will include 12 months of Trusts & Estates magazine and access to premium content on WealthManagement.com.

TAGS: Archive
Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish