New on the Shelf

Virtual-Office Tools for a High-Margin Practice, David J. Drucker and Joel P. Bruckenstein Are you so buried in paperwork, nettlesome compliance issues or personnel problems that you don't even remember why you got into this business in the first place? David Drucker and Joel Bruckenstein feel your pain. They've written this guide to siphoning off extraneous workload and fuss at your financial planning

Virtual-Office Tools for a High-Margin Practice, David J. Drucker and Joel P. Bruckenstein

Are you so buried in paperwork, nettlesome compliance issues or personnel problems that you don't even remember why you got into this business in the first place? David Drucker and Joel Bruckenstein feel your pain. They've written this guide to siphoning off extraneous workload and fuss at your financial planning practice. Tips include virtual filing systems, information on different storage techniques, and convenient web conferencing. Yes, it's supposed to save your money — but more importantly, save your sanity.

Legacy: The History of Separately Managed Accounts, Sydney LeBlanc

Journalist Sydney LeBlanc, former editor-in-chief of Registered Rep., tells the vast chronicle of separately managed accounts, from the 1960s to present day. Originally, researchers at Harvard University came up with the idea, and managed accounts remained a niche product until the last few years, when they gained greater acceptance. Now, they're all over the place. But this tome stresses that for all the emphasis now on separate accounts, the initial idea was simply to help clients find a new way to manage their money.

Wheels of Fortune: The History of Speculation from Scandal to Respectability, Charles R. Geisst

You think Enron was bad? You should have seen Benjamin Hutchinson try to corner the wheat market in 1866. His classic quote: “Ethics, the word has a curious rattle. Its meaning is hardly known in business today.” This comprehensive look at notorious financial industry scandals from historian Charles Geisst (Wall Street: A History) not only scuttlebutts the good stuff, it also looks at regulators' continuing creative efforts to stop wrongdoing.

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